Location: DESCENDANTS of the Tudors

Discussion: Tudor relationReported This is a featured thread

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DeonneReese
Tudor relation
Mar 26 2011, 9:00 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 26 2011, 9:00 AM EDT
My husband is directly related to the Rhys (Tudor- Rhys) family, who were once Princes of Wales before the crown was taken over by another branch of the family, but then returned when Henry III (a Rhys cousin) became King. 2  out of 3 found this valuable. Do you?    
Keyword tags: Tudor descendants
HeverRose
HeverRose
1. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 26 2011, 10:48 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 26 2011, 10:48 AM EDT
Well is Jonny a relation as well??? How cool would that be!!! 0  out of 1 found this valuable. Do you?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
2. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 26 2011, 10:54 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 26 2011, 10:54 AM EDT
"Well is Jonny a relation as well??? How cool would that be!!!"
Except that Jonny's real name is O'Keefe, He chose the name Rhys-Meyers. I know the Meyers was his mother's name but not sure about Rhys.
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KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
3. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 3:21 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 3:29 PM EDT
Rhys means son. It's no real name, well yes it is a name, but people put it to indicate their linage and where they come from.

Like the swedish addition of son, in Janson. Erickson. Means only Jan's son and Erick's son.

He chose Meyers as his last name and then put the Rhys as "Son of Meyers" to make clear he was her son and she his mother.
Jonathan Son of Meyers: Jonathan Rhys Meyers
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thorned_rose84
thorned_rose84
4. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 3:43 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 3:43 PM EDT
That is so cool Deonne!
I wonder if JRM knew that when he chose his stage name...
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KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
5. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 3:50 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 3:50 PM EDT
Know what? Do you find this valuable?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
6. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:01 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:01 PM EDT
"Rhys means son. It's no real name, well yes it is a name, but people put it to indicate their linage and where they come from.

Like the swedish addition of son, in Janson. Erickson. Means only Jan's son and Erick's son.

He chose Meyers as his last name and then put the Rhys as "Son of Meyers" to make clear he was her son and she his mother.
Jonathan Son of Meyers: Jonathan Rhys Meyers
"
I think you are mixing up the "ap Rhys" which means son of Rhys....
Ap is the welsh equivalent of the English "son" and the scottish "mac" and the irish "O"

http://www.genealogytoday.com/genealogy/answers/What_does_the_term_ap_mean_in_a_family_name.html

Rhys is a name by itself and can be a first name or a surname and it means : "Dragon", "fervor", "passion", "ultimate strength", "king" or "zeal"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhys
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HeverRose
HeverRose
7. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:07 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:07 PM EDT
I just looked it up on several baby name sites. It is a given name of Welch origin meaning ardor or enthusiasm. Cool name for sure! 3  out of 3 found this valuable. Do you?    
KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
8. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:08 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:12 PM EDT
Of course Rhys is a real name as well. But it's mainly (did I just say manely? :P) used as a name to indicate where you come from, it's an old Irish and Welsh usage. If you check out a few Irish or Welsh people you will often see them being called Rhys and when you look up their parents you will see they are often as well called Rhys. And mostly they use it when their parents have two different names, then they pick one of the family names for their child and put a Rhys before it.

Like maybe, John Rhys Davies, for example. Same method.

Yes as a real name, as which it can be used as well, it means the things you mentioned as well as 'enthusiasm'

But I was referring to another meaning, the meaning of "son of".
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MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
9. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:15 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:15 PM EDT
"Of course Rhys is a real name as well. But it's manely used as a name to indicate where you come from, it's an old Irish and Welsh usage. If you check out a few Irish or Welsh people you will often see them being called Rhys and when you look up their parents you will see they are often as well called Rhys. And mostly they use it when their parents have two different names, then they pick one of the family names for their child and put a Rhys before it.

Like maybe, John Rhys Davies, for example. Same method.

Yes as a real name, as which it can be used as well, it means the things you mentioned as well as 'enthusiasm'

But I was referring to another meaning, the meaning of "son of". "
Perhaps you would like to show us where you found that definition?

Here is the Rhys family name history : http://www.houseofnames.com/rhys-family-crest
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KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
10. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:25 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:26 PM EDT
Where I found that? Have you ever been to Wales maybe? Rhys is often used same as the Mac, the ap, and ab, the O in those countries. Of course, I never said it is not as well used as a single male boys name, or a family name, but it can as well and is often used as meaning son of. I will give you an example... let me see

Here:
Sir Rhys Rhys-Williams. Was a welsh politican.
He was born Rhys Williams.
His father was called Judge Gwilym Williams.
So he changed his name to Rhys Rhys Williams.

The quickest example I could find.

And that is the same here, he could have as well taken ap Meyers, but Rhys simply sounds better. So he changed the O'Keeffe. Son of Keeffe. to Rhys Meyers. Son of Meyers. As he and his mother were very close.
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MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
11. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 27 2011, 4:32 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 27 2011, 4:32 PM EDT
Yes I have been to Wales and yes I have seen people use two names together many many times. But I don't believe it means "son of". It is nowhere in any genealogy books or webpages the same as ap, mac, o..etc. I am sorry to disagree but if you can find somewhere that says that I would appreciate it. 5  out of 5 found this valuable. Do you?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
12. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 28 2011, 5:26 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 28 2011, 5:26 AM EDT
Doing further research on this subject... I found a couple of welsh genealogy sites which explain about something called Patronymics. So the name Rhys, per se, does not mean "son of" however, one could combine the first name of a father, grandfather or male ancestor with your last name which will indicate lineage.

http://www.jonesgenealogy.com/archive/patronymics-overview.asp

http://www.welshleigh.org/genealogy/welshnames.html

As to why JRM would use it..... Perhaps his mother's father's name was Rhys? Or perhaps he just liked the sound of the three names.
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juliana-angela
juliana-angela
13. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 28 2011, 8:36 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 28 2011, 8:36 AM EDT
I have to agree with Ms. Squirrly here.

My family come from Wales originally, and 'ap' or 'ab' means 'son of'', whilst 'ferch' means daughter. Rhys is a first name or a surname in the same way that Lewis, Fraser, Ross and many other names are: it does not mean 'son'.

The confusion here may have arisen because in Celtic countries such as Wales, Scotland and Ireland, it was not uncommon to have two first names, particularly in earlier centuries. This was probably to help indicate what branch of the family the person belonged to, as Ms. Squirrly said, and also to distinguish between people when there were fewer surnames and first names than you would find today. The practice remains in areas such as the Western Isles of Scotland, where a man might be known as 'Donald John' (McDonald) to distinguish him from his distant cousin 'Donald James' (McDonald)...
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KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
14. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 28 2011, 9:00 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 28 2011, 9:00 AM EDT
I agree with MsSquirrly as well, all she said was true, never debated over that fact. :)

But as far as I know, it is also used as a son of, maybe not that spread or public it seems, maybe that is a very rare usage. I only lately talked about that with my Irish mates while celebrating St. Patricks day. As that topic came up since Rhys is part of my name and often people wonder what it means.
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jrmslady09
jrmslady09
15. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 28 2011, 10:44 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 28 2011, 10:44 AM EDT
Fascinating discussion!!! I recently read an article where names such as Rhys for men or Reece for women have become and are becoming more popular due to actors and such using them as both professional and actual names!!! I personally think that no matter why JRM chose it he made a clever and interesting choice because it makes not only a statement but,if for no other reason it has a beauty that mirrors the talent of the man himself!!!
@ KingHenryVIII,just curious which part of your name is Rhys as most of here know each other names and some even have explanation I am of course respectful if you choose not to reply or respond to my question!!!
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KingHenryVIII
KingHenryVIII
16. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 28 2011, 2:46 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 28 2011, 2:46 PM EDT
Reece is used for boys, the female version is Reese or Rees, with s not c. But yes both come from Rhys. I'ts my glue name, the one keeping my first and last together. :-D I didnt hear about people using that name often, I find it still to be a rare name and beautiful. 2  out of 2 found this valuable. Do you?    
HeverRose
HeverRose
17. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 29 2011, 9:51 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 29 2011, 9:51 AM EDT
"Reece is used for boys, the female version is Reese or Rees, with s not c. But yes both come from Rhys. I'ts my glue name, the one keeping my first and last together. :-D I didnt hear about people using that name often, I find it still to be a rare name and beautiful."
So is your first name Jonathan and your last name Meyers?
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royalfalcon
royalfalcon
18. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 29 2011, 11:25 AM EDT | Post edited: Mar 29 2011, 11:25 AM EDT
"So is your first name Jonathan and your last name Meyers?"
Haha, do you think that His Majesty has been holding out on us HeverRose?
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Kittywake09
Kittywake09
19. RE: Tudor relation
Mar 29 2011, 12:07 PM EDT | Post edited: Mar 29 2011, 12:07 PM EDT
"Reece is used for boys, the female version is Reese or Rees, with s not c. But yes both come from Rhys. I'ts my glue name, the one keeping my first and last together. :-D I didnt hear about people using that name often, I find it still to be a rare name and beautiful."
Not rare in UK it is very popular !!
4  out of 4 found this valuable. Do you?    
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