Location: The Tudors Wiki Discussion Forum

Discussion: Culpeper confessionReported This is a featured thread

Showing 1 - 12 of 12  |  Show  posts at a time
FerretsRus2
FerretsRus2
Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 5:54 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 5:54 PM EDT
Hi! Why did Culpeper go so far as to admit that he had intended to do ill with the queen and she with him? I read somewhere that in reality he never ever confessed to having sex with Katherine but that he did confess that he ultimately meant to commit adultery. As Edward Seymour said on the episode, the intent to commit adultery is still high treason. Culpeper must have known this so why did he say it knowing he would surely die for it? Or did he know that all hope was lost for him so stating the obvious wouldn't change a thing? In real life was this statement extracted from him under torture? Was Culpeper tortured? Oh man, I wish that they had done more with this in the episode, and I wish that we had gotten more insight into his motives.
Do you find this valuable?    
Keyword tags: Culpeper episode 5 Season 4
LadyElizabeth69
LadyElizabeth69
1. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 6:04 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 6:04 PM EDT
As much as you do not want an episode like episode 5 to be dragged out due to how upsetting it is, I agree that I do wish they had developed the Culpepper character a little bit more. Specifically in episode 5 when all of a sudden he was arrested, said 1 thing, and then executed, I feel that went extremely fast in the episode and was not developed a little better, even though I know the focus was meant to be mostly on Katharine. Do you find this valuable?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
2. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 6:12 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 6:12 PM EDT
Historically, he did actually say those words - check his profile here on the wiki : http://tudorswiki.sho.com/page/Thomas+Culpepper
As to why?....the series doesn't really have the time to get into everyone's motives but more than likely at some point he knew the gig was up and all he could hope for was a swift death by confessing that he "intended to do ill" which really shows, he didn't commit adultery...it was an intention.
Do you find this valuable?    
FerretsRus2
FerretsRus2
3. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 6:49 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 6:53 PM EDT
I saw the quote on the wiki page but there wasn't a source for it. Can anyone give me a source where details from his confession can be found? Starkey perhaps? :) Do you find this valuable?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
4. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 7:03 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 7:03 PM EDT
"I saw the quote on the wiki page but there wasn't a source for it. Can anyone give me a source where details from his confession can be found? Starkey perhaps? :)"
Yes most of the wiki is sourced....this confession is in several books. Starkey's Six Wives page 680 says ....:" the intention was there, 'He intended', he admitted 'and meant to do ill with the Queen and that likewise the queen so minded with him'. It was little. But it proved enough for the law".
(from Letters and papers XVI, 1339)
Do you find this valuable?    

frogy23
5. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 7:09 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 7:09 PM EDT
LadyElizabeth I agree that the Culpepper portion went very quickly. But in some ways it was in keeping with the way the character was written/acted. He was a complete mystery really. We aren't sure if he loved or lusted or if he simply wanted to take something that was the king's. We saw that he was blatantly cruel but I found myself dying to know how he really felt about Katherine, as there were hints that it was more than lust. Do you find this valuable?    
FerretsRus2
FerretsRus2
6. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 7:11 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 7:11 PM EDT
Thanks! Do you find this valuable?    
FerretsRus2
FerretsRus2
7. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 7:14 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 7:14 PM EDT
Was there a mention in this book of him being "put to the rack" as Dereham was? Do you find this valuable?    
MsSquirrly
MsSquirrly
8. RE: Culpeper confession
May 12 2010, 7:48 PM EDT | Post edited: May 12 2010, 7:48 PM EDT
"Was there a mention in this book of him being "put to the rack" as Dereham was?"
No, Starkey says " He was examined soon after his arrival in the Tower, and, protected by his rank and favour from the kind of duress that was freely applied to Dereham, he told a balanced and nuanced tale. He stressed that Catherine had taken the initiative. But he also admitted the strength of his own feelings , and the eagerness with which he had responded. He is, in short, to be believed."
page 675
Do you find this valuable?    

JaneStephanieRudolf
9. RE: Culpeper confession
Jun 28 2011, 3:09 AM EDT | Post edited: Jun 28 2011, 3:09 AM EDT
I wondered the same thing too. I have just watched the episode last night where Kathrine Howard, Henry Mannox, Francis Dereham and Thomas Culpepper were sentenced to death. The way the men died and was tortured was horrific and has haunted me since the scene where they hang Culpepper (or is it Dereham) and afterwards kill him brutaly by sticking a burning iron tool into his stomac. I was sick watching it, and wondered how on earth is was possible for the executer to carry out his job? Was he forced to do it, and if not he himself would be killed too? What was the point by hanging people and take them down and do these things to them afterwards? If the act by hanging them by the nech in a rope had no effect other than to hurt them, why not just leave it be (I know it sounds silly to ask such questions, but I just can't imagine how they must have thought at those times and what made them treat each other in such horrible ways).
I also wondered if there were any way to escape, if you were already arrested and that the King or other powerful men had a wish to put you down (execute you?) Why let the convicted have the chance to defend themselves, if there's no way of getting out of it, no matter which answers is given?
I have so many thoughts about how it must have been like to have lived back then. It surely seems that the condictions were very cruel, no matter if you were born rich or not, and those who were the Kings allied couldn't feel safe at any point.
Do you find this valuable?    
Elliemental
Elliemental
10. RE: Culpeper confession
Jun 28 2011, 5:53 AM EDT | Post edited: Jun 28 2011, 5:53 AM EDT
It was simply the executioner's job. It was his livelihood, and he probably thought that he was doing good by disposing of a few more traitors. As for being forced to hang, draw and quarter someone, I'm sure that after a while they become largely detached from and desensitised to their jobs. Do you find this valuable?    
HeverRose
HeverRose
11. RE: Culpeper confession
Jun 28 2011, 7:59 AM EDT | Post edited: Jun 28 2011, 7:59 AM EDT
There was also no police force to keep order. So behaviour had to be controlled with the most horrific images of what happens if you don' t toe the line.

I also think there is deep cruelty in some people, and such people are probably the ones who applied to be executioners. .

1  out of 1 found this valuable. Do you?    

Related Content

  (what's this?Related ContentThanks to keyword tags, links to related pages and threads are added to the bottom of your pages. Up to 15 links are shown, determined by matching tags and by how recently the content was updated; keeping the most current at the top. Share your feedback on WikiFoundry Central.)