Location: Jane Seymour - Historical profile

Discussion: Jane Seymour and lack of bath???????Reported This is a featured thread

Showing 4 posts
Jes89
Jes89
Jane Seymour and lack of bath???????
Jun 17 2009, 1:55 PM EDT | Post edited: Jun 17 2009, 1:55 PM EDT
Extracted of " Adventures in the History" , nº 48, August of 2007

Jane Seymour, the third of the six women with who king Henry VIII of England was married, died for lack bath. She had pathological water phobia and she did not allow her ladies t give her the bath later the birth of her son Edward VI. She caught an infection and died in 12 days, to the 28 years.
Do you find this valuable?    
Keyword tags: None

Reggie19
1. RE: Jane Seymour and lack of bath???????
Jun 17 2009, 2:02 PM EDT | Post edited: Jun 17 2009, 2:02 PM EDT
You know those survival instincts that apparently overtook Bruce Ismay when he absconded the Titanic in a lifeboat restricted to women and children only? Could they not have overtaken Jane Seymour when she was near death after giving birth to her son? While i find that extract highly unlikely, somethings gotta give, i had a phobia of water once, but it didn't prevent me from taking a bath, just from dunking my head under the water, lol! Do you find this valuable?    

TheMidwife
2. RE: Jane Seymour and lack of bath???????
Jun 17 2009, 5:21 PM EDT | Post edited: Jun 17 2009, 5:21 PM EDT
The lack of a bath after childbirth is not what killed Jane Seymour.

The bacteria had been introduced hours before she would have even been given the option to bathe. And since she had a difficult labor, it is very likely that the midwives/doctors attending her would have done vaginal exams quite frequently (all without washing their hands). The timeframe of her death completely matches pueperal fever
1  out of 1 found this valuable. Do you?    

tjb22
3. RE: Jane Seymour and lack of bath???????
Jun 17 2009, 5:43 PM EDT | Post edited: Jun 17 2009, 5:43 PM EDT
"The lack of a bath after childbirth is not what killed Jane Seymour.

The bacteria had been introduced hours before she would have even been given the option to bathe. And since she had a difficult labor, it is very likely that the midwives/doctors attending her would have done vaginal exams quite frequently (all without washing their hands). The timeframe of her death completely matches pueperal fever"
Edward was a large baby, and she probably tore quite a bit as well, leaving a very open site for infection.

Not bathing after childbirth is not something that was only taboo 500 years ago. My own grandmother, as well as my husband's grandmother, followed the 10 day rule...for 10 days following delivery, a woman did not get up out of her bed. They no doubt did not "bathe" other than a quick sponging off during that time. Most likely, they didn't do a full immersion bath for awhile before delivery as well....people were very worried about "exposure" (getting wet and cold) leading to all kinds of infections.
Do you find this valuable?