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British Royal and Noble Tiaras
featuring tiaras worn by the children and grandchildren of HM Queen Victoria

Tiaras of the Tudor Ladies
WORK BY GOLDENAGED.ER

Queen Alexandra Russian Kokoshnik
QUEEN ALEXANDRA RUSSIAN KOKOSHNIK

TIARAS of the Tudors Ladies - The Tudors Wiki
Queen Mary of Teck,
Queen Consort of Great Britain

(above)
Originally given to Queen Alexandra on her Silver Wedding Anniversary in 1888.
SEE BELOW FOR FULL DESCRIPTION
HM Queen Elizabeth II


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Detail of the tiara
Queen Alexandra with Queen Louise and the Duchess of Fife

Queen Alexandra, Queen Louise, consort of Denmark
(mother of Queen Alexandra), and Alexandra's daughter, Louise, the Duchess of Fife.


HM Alexandra of Denmark, Queen consort of the United Kingdom
The Russian Kokoshnik Tiara
The tiara was presented to Princess Alexandra on her Silver Wedding Anniversary in 1888 by Lady Salisbury on behalf of 365 peeresses of the United Kingdom. Alexandra had requested that the tiara be in the fashionable design of a Russian girl's headdress, a kokoshnik. She knew the design well from a similar tiara belonging to her sister Marie Feodorovna, the Empress of Russia. The tiara was made by Garrard Jewellers and supervised by Lady Salisbury. It is made up of 61 platinum bars and encrusted with 488 diamonds, the largest of which being 3.25 carats each. Princess Alexandra wrote to her aunt, the Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz
.
"The presents are quite magnificent. The ladies of society gave a lovely diamond spiked tiara".
Alexandra of Denmark, Queen consort of the United Kingdom
One of the interesting characteristics of Kokoshnik or fringe tiaras is that each piece is attached only to the base, so it is free to move unless fastened into a frame.
That is why they are often worn as necklaces or swag corsages as well. The tiara in question would not need to be altered from the version Alexandra wore to the version we see now, if the central jewel is indeed a hairpin.

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Hairpins were common in the 1870s and 1880s, so this seems viable enough. In order for the tiara to appear "tighter" as it did, for example, when HM wore it recently in Canada, it only need be fastened into a more restrictive frame.

The tiara has been a royal favorite ever since.

HM Queen Elizabeth II
CAMBRIDGE LOVERS KNOT
Cambridge Lovers Knot Tiara 1913 Version
The above picture is the 1913 Version of the Tiara in which the original pearl spikes are removed.

The circlet of the Cambridge Lovers Knot Tiara is made up of a lower semi-circular band, set with a row of round brilliant-cut diamonds. Nineteen inverted arches arise from the lower band, also set with round brilliant cut diamonds. Where two adjacent arches meet a pillar-like structure is formed that rises up and ends in a large round brilliant-cut diamond, forming a diamond spike. There are nineteen diamond spikes of this nature, and the size of these diamonds decrease gradually from the center towards both ends.

A combination of lovers knots and scroll motifs is placed at the upper end of each inverted arch. The center of each lovers knot is occupied by a large round brilliant-cut diamond, from which arises two large drop-shaped pearls, one suspended in the space inside the inverted arch, and the other rising above the surface of the tiara as a spike. There are nineteen arches and nineteen drop-shaped pearls inside the arches, and nineteen drop-shaped pearls rising as spikes, making a total of 38 drop-shaped pearls.
Cambridge Lover's Knot
The largest drop-shaped pearl is exactly in the central arch of the tiara, with nine drop-shaped pearls gradually decreasing in size occupying the nine arches on either side. The pearl spikes that rise up above the surface of the tiara also follow a similar trend in size and arrangement. Thus the Lovers Knot Tiara is perfectly symmetrical about its median line.

The tiara is essentially made of repeated units of the same motif, consisting of the inverted arch, with the lovers knot and the scrolls and the two pearls, the pendant and the spike situated inside the arch.

HM Queen Elizabeth II
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
wearing the tiara above.


HM Queen Mary

Queen Mary
wearing the 1913 version of the Cambridge Lovers Knot Tiara, with the pearl spikes removed. 4 of the pearls that were removed are used as pendants on the 4-strand pearl necklace she is wearing.

Cambridge Lover's Knot Original design
Above is the design of the original tiara with pearl spikes. Each pearl was lettered; the top and hanging ones were lettered separately to ensure they were put together correctly.

Queen Mary's tiara is similar to the tiara of her grandmother, Princess Augusta of Hesse. It wasn't a unique design to begin with; several others exist that are quite similar. The piece passed from Princess Augusta to her daughter (also named Augusta), who became Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.


Queen Mary
With the Pearl spikes
(above)


Diana, Princess of Wales
*After the divorce of Princess Diana of Wales and Prince Charles the tiara was given back to the Queen.

Lady Diana, Princess of Wales
Queen Mary Fringe, Hanover Russian Fringe
QUEEN MARY FRINGE TIARA [no. 1]
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
Queen Mary
This tiara (which can also be worn as a necklace) was made for Queen Mary in 1919. It is not, as has sometimes been claimed, made with diamonds that had belonged to George III but re-uses diamonds taken from a necklace/tiara purchased by Queen Victoria from Collingwood & Co as a wedding present for Queen Mary in 1893. [Source: The Royal Collection © 2008,
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II]
Queen Mary's Fringe TiaraIn August 1936, Queen Mary gave the tiara to Queen Elizabeth.
HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother nee Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
Queen Elizabeth later loaned it to her daughter, Princess Elizabeth, the future Elizabeth II as "something borrowed" for her wedding in 1947.
HM Queen Elizabeth II as Princess Elizabeth
As The Princess Elizabeth was getting dressed at Buckingham Palace the tiara snapped. Luckily the court jeweller was standing by in case of emergency.
HRH Princess Elizabeth's Wedding
The jeweller was rushed to his work
room by a police escort. Queen Elizabeth reassured her daughter that it would be fixed in time, and it was. If looked at closely you can see where the tiara had to be fixed.
HRH Princess Elizabeth's Wedding
The Queen Mother later also loaned it to her granddaughter The Princess Anne for her marriage to Captain Mark Phillips in 1973.
HRH Princess Anne, Princess Royal
The Princess Anne, Princess Royal c. 1973
HM Queen Elizabeth II
A recent photo of Her Majesty wearing her wedding tiara for a state visit to Trinidad and Toba
go, Nov 2009.
Strathmore Rose Tiara of HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother
STRATHMORE ROSE TIARA
HM Queen Mother, Queen Elizabeth
The Strathmore Rose Tiara was a wedding gift to the Queen Mum from her father, the Earl of Strathmore.
The Queen Mum was born Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, daughter of the later
14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and Cecilia Nina Cavendish-Bentinck.
Detail of Strathmore Rose Tiara
It’s a delicate tiara, worn by the Queen Mum as a bandeau low across her forehead (a stylish way to wear a tiara in the ‘20s and ‘30s); it can also be worn in a more traditional way on the top of the head.
Lady Elizabeth
wore it quite frequently as The Duchess of York. The tiara was never worn by any other royal and has not been seen for decades.
Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother
Vladimir tiara with emeralds
GRAND DUCHESS VLADIMIR TIARA
WITH THE CAMBRIDGE EMERALDS
MODIFIED VERSION BY QUEEN MARY

Queen Mary, who was renowned for her collection of royal jewels, and took pride in superbly bejeweling herself for formal occasions had an intimate knowledge of jewelry and their designing, and decided that the "Vladimir Tiara" needed modification.
HM Queen Elizabeth II
Her intention was to make provision for the pearl drops to be interchanged with emerald drops, as and when the need arose.
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Accordingly she got the court jewelers Garrard & Co. to cut and polish fifteen of her remaining Cambridge emeralds as drop shaped emeralds, and to make provision for their replacement on the tiara whenever it was needed, after removing the pearl drops. As anticipated the replacement of the pearls with the emerald drops further enhanced the beauty of the tiara, which became a favorite tiara for Queen Mary, particularly when she was wearing the matching emerald suite, the Cambridge and Delhi Durbar Parure.

Thus the incorporation of the exceptional quality Cambridge emeralds into the "Vladimir Tiara" made it a complementary piece to the Cambridge and Delhi Durbar Parure.
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VICTORIAN ORIENTAL CIRCLET
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The inspiration for the design of this tiara, which includes ‘Moghul’ arches framing lotus flowers, came from Prince Albert who had been greatly impressed by the Indian jewels presented to the Queen by the East India Company at the conclusion of the Great Exhibition. This was one of many instances where the Prince supervised the design and setting of the Queen’s jewellery. ‘Albert has such taste & arranges everything for me about my jewels,’ she wrote. Made in 1853 by R. & S. Garrard & Co.
Apparently, the
Oriental Circlet tiara originally had opals and Victoria replaced them with rubies.
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The tiara was passed to the Queen Mum who wore it frequently.When she died, the tiara passed to HM Queen Elizabeth.
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Tiara watchers have come to call this the 5 Aquamarine Tiara which was worn by the Queen while she was in Canada.

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No one is sure about this tiara or where it came from; perhaps it was yet another tiara which Queen Mary bought but never wore.

What is known is that the Queen has lent this tiara out to HRH The Countess of Wessex twice now.

HRH The Countess of WessexThe tiara was loaned to HRH The Countess of Wessex for the dinner gala for the Luxembourg wedding on 20 October 2012.
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It was again loaned to HRH The Countess of Wessex for the wedding of Princess Madeleine of Sweden in June 2013. Princess Madeleine is the younger sister of Crown Princess Victoria (heiress to the throne of Sweden).
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1971 remastered Brazilian Aquamarine tiara of HM Queen Elizabeth II
The Brazilian Aquamarine Tiara


The Brazil parure is one of the most modern jewels in the collection. In 1953, the President and people of Brazil presented Elizabeth II with the coronation gift of a necklace and matching pendant earrings of aquamarines and diamonds.


More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors WikiOriginally the tiara consisted of a bandeau with 3 upright aquamarines. Later it was augmented to its present form. When first made in 1957, the tiara consisted of the three upright rectangular stones (detachable for use as brooches), mounted on a simple platinum band.

The large central stone was originally the pendant of the necklace given to The Queen by the President and People of Brazil in 1953 as a Coronation present.
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Queen Elizabeth ordered the royal jeweller Garrard to complete the parure with a tiara. This wonderful creation has an aquamarine as a focal point which exceeds in size and beauty all other stones of this set.

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In 1971 the tiara was redesigned and adapted to take four scroll ornaments from an aquamarine and diamond head jewel
given to The Queen by the Governor of São Paulo in 1968, seen below. The central stone of the first tiara was subsequently returned to the necklace.
Source: The Royal Collection
Sapphire Suite Tiara
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In 1963, the Queen had a tiara and bracelet made to match the King George VI Victorian Sapphire Suite she was given as a wedding present.
The George VI Victorian Suite was originally a present by George VI of the United Kingdom to his daughter Princess Elizabeth in 1947.
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The sapphire tiara was made with a sapphire collar of Louise of Belgium, Princess of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha bought by the QUEEN in 1963.
Princess Louise of Belgium
In 1907 there was a scandal at the Belgian Royal Court, and that's why the family has so few historic jewels.

Louise, daughter of King Leopold II, who left her husband, Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, had so many debts that her creditors wanted to take possession of her share of her mother's inheritance.
It was about the jewels Queen Marie-Henriëtte left her in 1902.

Neither her husband nor her father wanted to pay her debts, and that's why the jewels were put up for auction in Brussels.

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CARTIER HALO SCROLL TIARA
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Originally worn by the Queen Mother, Lady Elizabeth. The tiara was purchased by the Duke of York (King George VI) for the Duchess of York (the Queen Mother) in 1936. It is a rolling cascade of scrolls that converge in a central ornament surmounted by a brilliant diamond.

HRH Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
Princess Margaret also borrowed the Scroll Diamond Tiara until given the Art Deco Fan Tiara by The Queen Mother.
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The tiara was given to Princess Elizabeth (later Queen) on her 18th birthday. The Queen never wore this tiara but loaned it out to her daughter Princess Anne.
HRH Princess Anne, Princess Royal
Princess Anne borrowed the Scroll Diamond Tiara from The Queen until she was given her paternal grandmother's, Princess Alice of Greece, Greek Key Meander tiara (see above) in 1972.
The Duchess of Cambridge
The tiara was most recently worn at the wedding of Catherine Middleton and Prince William, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.
The Queen loaned the tiara to Miss Middleton for the day.
FRINGE TIARA [NO. 2]
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
This tiara (which can also be worn
as a necklace) is humpier in the middle and shorter on the sides then the Fringe tiara above,
while longer round the back of her head compared to the Queen Mum. It's almost like she is wearing a necklace on her head with no frame
to support it.


There have been many
discussions about these
photographs and whether it's the Queen Mary fringe or not. She
could have altered the tiara which Mary was known to do with jewels.

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck

The fringe tiara/necklace was very popular between the reigns of
Queen Victoria and the Queen
Mum.

Victoria herself gave quite a few tiaras/necklaces as wedding
presents to her children and her daughter-in-laws ie Princess Margaret Louise of Prussia,
Duchess of Connaught.


HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck



Greek Key Tiara (belonging to Princess Alice of Greece and Princess Anne)
THE GREEK BATTENBURG MENDER TIARA

The tiara belonged to
Princess Alice of Battenburg
(mother of the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh)
.
Princess Alice of Battenberg, Princess of Greece and Denmark
Her Serene Highness Princess Victoria Alice of Battenberg was born in the Tapestry Room at Windsor Castle in Berkshire in the presence of her great-grandmother, Queen Victoria at the queen's invitation. She was the eldest child of Prince Louis of Battenberg and his wife Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. Her mother was the eldest daughter of Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse, the second daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.
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The meander tiara is in the classical Greek 'key pattern' featuring a large brilliant cut diamond in the centre surrounded by a diamond wreath. The tiara also incorporates a central wreath of leaves and scrolls on either side. This tiara was a wedding gift to the then Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth II) from her mother-in-law, Princess Alice. HRH Princess Anne, The Princess Royal
The Queen has never worn it in public and it was given to Princess Anne around 1972. Princess Anne has worn the tiara in public, notably during her engagement to Mark Phillips.
Zara Phillips, daughter of Princess Anne

The tiara was lent to Anne's daughter, Zara Phillips, above, on the occasion of her wedding on 30 July 2011.


Nizam of Hyderabad Parure
The Nizam of Hyderabad Parure

The gift of the Nizam of Hyderabad to the Queen of England as a coronation gift included a diamond tiara and set consisting of necklace made of roses and old-cut diamond, the diadem was used several years ago for a tiara and the other does not exist in this form.
Nizam tiara of HM Queen Elizabeth II
According to Leslie Feld's The Jewels of Queen Elizabeth II, 1992
the new form is now what is known as the Burma ruby tiara which includes rubies and diamonds as the main focus.

The Burma ruby tiara was apparently made with pieces from this tiara which was made by the court jeweler for the Queen, by Garrard in 1973.

The tiara has beautiful roses, set over and over from precious diamonds.

The Queen has more than 300 pieces in her private gem collection; the jewels of her late mother and the incredible treasures of Queen Alexandra and Queen Mary which include many beautiful pieces which can be seen in their photographs. Her collection also includes pieces from the late Queen Victoria and relatives from the different European houses which the Royal family married into -- some of them were bequeathed to Her Majesty through inheritance.
HM Queen Elizabeth II
The roses of the original tiara were supposedly taken to be made into Rose Brooches for The Queen. This is not for certain though.
HM Queen Elizabeth II
Made by Cartier and later broken up to be used in new setting, in the Burmese Ruby Rose Tiara, made by Court jeweller Garrard.HM Queen Elizabeth II
Duchess of Teck Tiara
Duchess of Teck Tiara
Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, nee Princess of the United Kingdom
Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge, Duchess of Teck; the mother of Queen Consort, Mary. Princess Mary was the granddaughter of King George III of Great Britain and thus cousin to Queen Victoria.
Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, nee Princess of the Great Britain
Queen Mary inherited her mother's jewelry The Duchess of Teck, like the neo classical ears of wheat tiara. This tiara is set with diamonds in tiers holding aloft the sheaves of wheat made in gold and silver.
Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, nee Princess of the United Kingdom
THE TECK CIRCLET
is a necklace made to be worn
along with the Teck diamond tiara. In both pictures of Mary Adelaide, above, she is wearing the necklace.

The necklace and tiara were passed to the Queen Mother. It is not quite sure whether The Queen Mother loaned or gave the necklace to her daughter, HRH Princess Margaret. If she gave
it to her it would have been passed to Margaret's son. Margaret's collection of jewels and tiaras were sold at Christie's in 2006. The Teck necklace was not part of the auction so it is thought that the necklace went back
to the current Queen as it was a
family heirloom.

HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother nee Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
The Queen Mother, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
wears the Teck Tiara
(above)
HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother
The Teck necklace could also be worn as a tiara which on occassion the Queen Mother did.
Poltimore Tiara
LADY POLTIMORE TIARA

Lady Poltimore
The Poltimore Tiara was originally created by Garrards in 1870 for Lady Poltimore, the wife of the 2nd Baron Poltimore.
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The Poltimore tiara Princess Margaret wore on her wedding day was purchased prior to her wedding, and was seen wearing the tiara in the form of the necklace prior to her wedding and continued to wear the piece in its various forms on many state occasions after her wedding day.

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The children of the late Princess, Viscount Linley and Lady Sarah Chatto, sold this and other items at an auction at Christie's in 2006 to pay the inheritance tax due on her estate.

The tiara fetched $1.7 million, far more than its $360,000 pre-sale estimate.
HRH Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
Teck Turquoise Tiara
THE TECK TURQUOISE TIARA
It was originally made for
Princess Mary Adelaide, mother of Queen Mary.
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For the full collection

CLICK HERE
It was then passed down to
Queen Mary (Mary of Teck)

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
The picture above shows the original tiara before Queen Mary altered it.
HRH Princess Alice Christabel, Duchess of Gloucester, nee Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott
Queen Mary then passed the suite along with the tiara to The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, her son Prince Henry and daughter-in-law, Lady Alice (later Princess Alice) as a wedding present. The parure which includes a necklace and earrings is still in the possession of the Gloucester's. The current Duchess wears the suite as seen below.

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Original version of the Turquoise tiara of the Queen Mum
PERSIAN TURQUOISE TIARA
HM Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mother nee Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
The antique parure of unknown provenance was a wedding gift from George V to the Queen Mother when she married the Duke of York in 1923. It was acquired at some point by Queen Mary, who evidently never wore it.

HRH Princess Margaret's Turquoise Tiara
The Persian Turquoise Tiara was part of a parure given to Margaret by the Queen Mother on her 21st birthday.

In addition to the tiara, it consisted of a necklace of graduated pendant drops, matching pendant earrings, several hair pieces and a brooch.
An alteration of the tiara was also made as can be seen by looking at both pictures.

Persian turquoise tiara of Princess Margaret

The present whereabouts are unknown. It is thought that perhaps the Queen may have it as it was once property of her mother, Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon.


HRH Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
Lady Sarah Chatto (Margaret's daughter) and the Countess of Swowden (Margaret's daughter-in-law) do not seem to have the jewels or tiara and they were not sold at the auction.
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HRH Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
Grand Duchess Marie Feodorovna of Russia's

Diamond and Sapphire Bandeau
The tiara was sold by Princess Nicholas of Greece (the former Grand Duchess Helena Vladimirovna) in 1921 to Queen Mary while the Greek royal family was living in exile in Paris. The Duchess had inherited many jewels from her mother and sold a number of pieces over the years to raise cash for the family. Queen Mary loaned the tiara to Princess Margaret on many occasions.
HM Queen Mary
Amethyst Parure (photoshopped)
Queen Mary's Amethyst Tiara

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
The tiara was bought along with a collection of Amethyst Jewels at an auction.
The collection was later sold after it was refused by Elizabeth for the
Royal Collection
.
HM Queen Mary
Queen Mary's Diamond Bandeau
HM Queen Mary
This diamond bandeau had lozenge-shaped motifs and was originally surmounted by 13 large oval oriental pearls set on spikes.

By 1946, however, Queen Mary had removed the pearls. In this picture she substituted the pearls for emeralds.
Katherine, Duchess of Kent
The tiara is currently in the possession of the Duke and Duchess of Kent. Pictured above: Katherine,
Duchess of Kent.
Gloucester Palmette Tiara
The Gloucester Palmette
Was owned by Queen Mary.
The diamond tiara is ornamented with a graduated frieze of styled honeysuckle.
HM Queen Mary
The central ornament is made to be separable; as seen below. It was completed before or during February 1914.

HRH Princess Alice Christabel, Duchess of Gloucester, nee Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott
The tiara was a Royal Wedding present to the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester,
Princess Alice Christabel and her husband.

HRH Princess Alice Christabel, Duchess of Gloucester, nee Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott
The Parure was then passed on to the current Duchess of Gloucester
HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, nee Birgitte Henriksen
Birgitte, Duchess of Gloucester wears the tiara with two different central stones. Pink topaz (above) and an emerald (below). The tiara in both styles has matching necklaces.
HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, nee Birgitte Henriksen

Ivegh Tiara
The Ivegh Tiara
Originally it belonged to Queen Mary.
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
Queen Mary
wears the Tiara.
(above)
It was a wedding gift from Lord and Lady Iveagh.
A diamond tiara formed by a band of leafage design and scrolls and surmounted with a graduation of round and drop shaped diamond collets.

Queen Mary then gave it to the
Duchess of Gloucester
as part of the her wedding presents.

HRH Princess Alice Christabel, Duchess of Gloucester, nee Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott
Princess Alice Christabel (above)
Duchess of Gloucester
The current Duchess of Gloucester
HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, nee Birgitte Henriksen

A diamond tiara formed by a band of leafage design and scrolls and surmounted with a graduation of round and drop shaped diamond collets.

Lady Rose Windsor
The Lady Rose Windsor
Daughter of
HRH Birgitte, Duchess of Gloucester.
She wore this Tiara on her wedding day, 19 July 2008 at Queen's Chapel, St. James's Palace in London.
The Wedding Tiara of The Countess of Wessex
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-Jones
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex
According to Ingrid Seward in an article she wrote for Majesty magazine (vol.20 no.7 p.15): "A diamond tiara from the Queen's private collection held the veil of silk tulle spotted with crystals in place even as it was buffeted by the wind."
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-Jones
Sophie's wedding tiara is said to have been made from the four anthemions that were detachable from Queen Victoria's Regal Circlet.

HRH The Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-Jones
According to Royalty magazine vol.16 no.1 p.40 (there is no mention of an author of this article), "Sophie wore a diamond tiara from the Queen's private collection, consisting of three open-work scroll motifs, designed and remodelled by the Crown Jeweller, David Thomas, at Asprey and Garrard."

According to Judy Wade in an article for Hello! magazine, June 29, 1999 issue, no.556 p.60, "Her 'something borrowed' was the diamond tiara with three open-work scroll motifs, designed by court jeweller David Thomas at Asprey & Garrard, which was lent by the Queen from her private collection."
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-Jones
Sophie of Wessex at the wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden, 2010.
Queen Mary
Cambridge Sapphire Tiara
Originally this tiara was of a diamond prong design with sapphires at the top. Now it is a grouping of sapphire and diamond flowers set on a velvet band. It was first given to the Grand Duchess Augusta of Mecklenberg-Strelitz,
Duchess of Cambridge who married Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge; son of King George III of the United Kingdom.
Her granddaughter, Queen Mary (above)
inherited it.

Princess Marina of Kent
Queen Mary then gave it as a wedding gift to Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark in 1934.

Princess Marina of Kent
The set now belongs to the current Duchess of Kent

Duchess of Kent
Ogilvy tiara
OGILVY TIARA
HRH Princess Alexandra, Lady Ogilvy
Princess Alexandra of Kent,
The Lady Ogilvy
was the daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Kent. Both the tiara and necklace have versatile stones that can be changed. Above, the Princess is wearing turquoise stones. Below, The Princess switches the turquoise for pearls. The necklace was made to replica the Jubilee necklace of her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria.

HRH Princess Alexandra, Lady Ogilvy
Another variation includes replacing the stones with Sapphires.
For more on the necklace;

CLICK HERE

HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent, Lady Ogilvy
Surrey Tiara

The County of Surrey Tiara


HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck

The tiara was given as one of the many gifts presented to Mary for her wedding. The tiara was a gift from the people of The County of Surrey.


HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck

The tiara can also be converted into a necklace.


Queen Mary
Queen Mary's
diamond bandeau
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
The diamond bandeau, like the one featured further up the page, was originally worn by Queen Mary with pearl spikes.

HRH Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom
When she was eighteen Princess Margaret borrowed a tiara from her grandmother Queen Mary. This diamond bandeau had lozenge-shaped motifs and was originally surmounted by 13 large oval oriental pearls set on spikes.
By 1946, however, Queen Mary had also removed the pearls on this bandeau leaving it plain. In September 1948, the Princess wore it on one of her first offical engagements when she represented her father, King George VI, at the Inauguration of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands in Amsterdam.
QUEEN MARY'S TIARAS
Ladies of England tiara of Queen Mary

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
LADIES OF ENGLAND DIAMOND TIARA
Another wedding gift from the Ladies of England.

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
The tiara can also be worn as a necklace (above) and as a decorative piece on her gown (below).
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
Wedding tiara of Queen Mary
HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of TeckQueen Mary received a fringe necklace from Queen Victoria upon her wedding to the then Duke of York, Prince George (later King George V). Both the Surrey Fringe (above) and the piece from Queen Victoria are nearly identical, which I suppose isn't that surprising given how common fringe designs were back then. I've highlighted the necklace and tiara on the sketch of wedding presents below:
Wedding presents to Princess Mary (later Queen Mary)
The above wedding photo is from Queen Mary's wedding day, where a fringe appears to be peeking out from behind the flowers perched on her head. Queen Victoria noted in her diary that day that Mary had worn
her present at the ceremony.
Queen Mary's loop tiara
DIAMOND LOOP TIARA
Queen Mary's "Loop Tiara" was created when she and the future George V were elevated to the titles of "Prince and Princess of Wales" upon the ascension of Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. It really is an interesting piece of workmanship, some experts refer to it as "egg shaped".

The tiara was formed of oval loops with flowers and leaves. Total weight of the 675 diamonds is 102 3/4 carats.
Mary of Teck, Queen Mary

It was commissioned from Boucheron for Queen Mary when she became the Princess of Wales
in 1902.

HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck

There was speculation that the tiara
was broken up to make the Delhi Durbar tiara.


HM Queen consort Mary of the United Kingdom, nee Princess Mary of Teck
Rundell Tiara of Queen Alexandra
RUNDELL DIAMOND TIARA
HM Queen consort Alexandra of the United Kingdom, nee Princess of Denmark
Above, Queen Alexandra is wearing her
Rundell diamond tiara. On the occasion of her wedding, Princess Alexandra was given the tiara by her groom, Edward the Prince of Wales.

Princess Alexandra, who came from Denmark, lacked jewels, so when she married in 1863, her fiance gave her a monumental parure of diamonds, a diamond tiara/coronet with matching necklace, a brooch and earrings with diamonds and pearls. The Princess wore the tiara on her wedding day.
The tiara's whereabouts are not known.

There has been three different versions of how Alexandra wore this tiara. The first, above, is the original setting.

HM Queen consort Alexandra of the United Kingdom, nee Princess of Denmark

Here, Alexandra has her diamond stars placed in between the arches.
The third version:
HM Queen Alexandra - Rundell tiara
A "lighter version of the tiara"
HM Queen consort Alexandra of the United Kingdom, nee Princess of Denmark
MYSTERY AMETHYST AND DIAMOND TIARA
OF QUEEN ALEXANDRA
"The Scotsman 21 June 1946" the following pre-auction report:

The Tiara that came from a Tsar


"The important diamond and amethyst tiara was composed of seven single oval amethysts graduating from the centre to lozm flowers, supported by twin leaves and single diamonds within a graduated oval diamond frame, each intersected by diamond bars, with single diamond tops, and supported by twin diamond semi-circles, with single line diamond base.


The beautiful diamond and amethyst tiara,and the sapphire and diamond collar, were both gifts to her from Tsar Alexander III, and bequeathed from her to the Duchess of Fife, mother of Lady Southesk, from whom the late owner inherited them. The diamond and amethyst necklace was specially designed to the order of Queen Alexandra."

Princess Maud of Fife

The picture above is Queen Alexandra's granddaughter Princess Maud of Fife, sister of the Duchess and daughter of Princess Royal, Louise. Maud is thought to have worn the tiara along with the necklace before it was sold.

The report from the auction in
The Scotsman 27 June 1946:
a diamond and amethyst tiara,
also the gift of the Czar
to the
late Queen and bequeathed to
the Duchess, sold for £1750.

Princess Mary's Fringe Tiara
PRINCESS ROYAL FRINGE TIARA
Princess Mary, Princess RoyalDiamond fringe tiara, composed of fifty-one graduated diamond spikes each intersected by a smaller graduated diamond collet spike, mounted on a graduated cushion-cut diamond collet single-line base. She received this fringe tiara as a wedding gift from Lord and Lady Inchcape. The tiara is detachable from its frame for use as a necklace.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
This jewel was sold, along with
much of the princess's collection,
after her death.
It sold for $19, 600 at the 1966 Christie's auction.
Later it was in the possession of the Dukes of Westminster.
English, c. 1890

Diamond and Sapphire Tiara of Queen Victoria
VICTORIAN DIAMOND AND SAPPHIRE TIARA
Queen Victoria's
tiara was designed by Prince Albert as a gift in 1842 and made at a cost of £415.

It is "a small flexible tiara in the Gothic taste with kite- and cushion-shaped sapphires and diamonds. The sapphires are set in gold and the diamonds in silver."

The tiara is also depicted in the portrait by Henry Richard Graves in 1874.

Queen Victoria
Above, an early painting of Queen Victoria of Great Britain and North Ireland wearing part of her sapphire parure. She always wore the same tiara but in different ways. The tiara, along with a coronet and brooch were designed for Victoria by her husband Prince Albert which she wore as he had arranged for her.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
THE HAREWOOD VICTORIAN SAPPHIRE AND DIAMOND TIARA

Princess Mary received the tiara from her father King George V as part of the sapphire parure as a wedding present. Queen Alexandra and Queen Mary didn't use the sapphire coronet. But, it was worn by the Princess Royal on numerous public occasions and after her death it disappeared from the public eye.

HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal

When Geoffrey Munn was assembling the tiaras which appeared at the loan exhibition in aid of The Samaritans at Wartski in London in 1997, he wrote to the Countess of Harewood to inquire as to whether they had any tiaras which had been the property of the late Princess Royal. Her reply was that there was only one and it was visible in the Winterhalter. The Samaritan exhibition was its first public exhibition in many years. It was also a highlight of the tiara exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2002.

Sources: Munn, Geoffrey. Tiaras A History of Splendour. Wartski. One Hundred Tiaras: An Evolution of Style 1800 - 1990.

Countess of Harewood
The Countess of Harewood has worn the tiara, as well as Andrea wife of Mark, 4th son of the Earl of Harewood in August 1992, at the occasion of her wedding.

HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal

Princess Mary here is dressed for Court wearing the jewels her father gave her along with the Queen Victoria cluster necklace with pendant, Queen Mary's sapphire brooch in the centre of her diamond tiara and the Prince of Wales' bracelet.

HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal
PRINCESS ROYAL TIARAS

HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal
King George V gave his daughter a truly magnificent parure of sapphires and diamonds as his wedding gift. It consisted of Queen Victoria's diamond and sapphire tiara (description above), her diamond and sapphire cluster necklace with Prince Albert's 1845 brooch as a detachable oval pendant and a bracelet of sapphire and diamond clusters.

Princess Mary, Viscountess Lascelles wore this parure at her first dinner party and dance where she and her husband entered her parents as the honoured guests at Chesterfield House.

King George wrote in his diary "Dear Mary looked charming and wore my sapphires."
The Honey Suckle TiaraHoney Suckle Tiara
Honeycomb Tiara of Princess Mary
The tiara was in the possession of H.M. Queen Mary (1867-1953), wife of H.M. King George V (1865-1936) and was a present to her daughter, H.R.H. The Princess Royal, Countess Harewood, (1897-1965) and thence by descent.

The tiara was made for
Princess Mary
, the only daughter of
Queen Mary.


Composed of five graduated diamond-set honeysuckle panels, circa 1865 - with five brooch fittings, could be worn on a frame with diamonds as seen in the picture above.
Sadly, the tiara was eventually sold at auction for $31,817 on 16 November 1999 at Geneva.
Queen Maud pearl tiara re-creation
Spiked Pearl Tiara of Queen Maud
Queen Maud of Norway's Pearl Tiara
Princess Maud of Wales, Queen consort of Norway
Youngest daughter of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom and Queen Alexandra
.
HM Queen consort Maud of Norway, nee Princess Maud of Wales
This pearl and diamond tiara was given to Queen Maud as a wedding present from her parents, Edward VII and Queen Alexandra
.
HM Queen Sonja of Norway
The front part of the tiara can be removed and the rest can be worn in a lower version. The original version was stolen from the British jeweler Garrard's in 1993.
Garrard's made a new one with pearls end diamonds who looked like the ones from the original tiara.
So today Queen Sonja of Norway wears a copy.

Queen Sonja lent this tiara to Princess Märtha Louise for her wedding with Ari Behn.
Märtha wore the smallest version.
HRH Princess Martha of Norway
The Crown Princess of Norway, nee Mette-Marit, below, was also lent the tiara for the wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden in 2010.
HRH Crown Princess of Norway
The Duchess of Fife's Massin Diamond TiaraFiFe Tiara
The diamond tiara is mounted in gold and set in silver. The pendant pear-shaped diamonds are articulated and move at the slightest touch. This jewel looks exactly alike to the tiara that Oscar Massin displayed at the Exposition Universelle of 1878.
HRH Princess Louise, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom
Some of the stones appear to be a different shape but every element of the design is the same. For these reasons, it is tempting to attribute the splendid piece to the jeweller who was famous in his own time for the lightness of his settings.

HRH Princess Louise, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom
Above: HRH Princess Royal, Duchess of Fife, (1867-1931), Princess Louise (Victoria Alexandra Dagmar) of Wales, wearing her wedding gift. It was the gift of her husband’s parents to his bride. They were married at Buckingham Palace in 1887.
HRH Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife
The Fife Tiara, worn here by Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife,
later Princess Arthur of Connaught.

(ABOVE)
She was the daughter of Princess Louise of Wales and the Duke of Fife.
The picture shows her robed for the 1937 Coronation of George VI.

Lady Alexandra Clare Carnegie
Above is
Caroline Bunting, Countess of Southesk
wife of David Charles Carnegie, Earl of Southesk; The Earl is the great-grandson of Louise, Princess Royal Duchess of Fife. Caroline was lent the tiara to wear on her wedding day - 16 June 1987. The Earl's sister Lady Alexandra Carnegie wore the tiara most recently for her wedding on 29 May 2001 to Mark Etherington.

Queen Maud's Vifte tiara
QUEEN MAUD'S VIFTE TIARAQueen Maud of Norway, nee Princess of the United Kingdom
A fan-shaped tiara of diamonds set in gold and silver, was the 18th birthday gift from Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom to her granddaughter, Princess Maud of Wales, the future Queen Maud in 1887. Princess Maud was the daughter of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom and Princess Alexandra of Denmark.
HM Queen Sonja of Norway
Queen Sonja now wears the tiara.Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway
At the pre-wedding gala before her wedding, the future Crown Princess Mette-Marit wore the tiara as a necklace.


Queen Maud's Diamond Tiara
Princess Maud's Diamond Tiara
HM Queen consort Maud of Norway, nee Princess Maud of Wales
This tiara with diamond clusters was a wedding present to Queen Maud, consort of Norway.

Queen Maud was the daughter of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom and Alexandra of Denmark.
Maud was born HRH Princess Maud of Wales, Princess of the United Kingdom.

The tiara is currently worn by Princess Ragnhild.
The diamond prongs on the tiara were originally interchangable with turquoises,
and Queen Maud often wore the tiara in this version before she inherited the other turquoise tiara.


In this painting, Maud appears to be wearing aquamarines on the top of the tiara, but it's actually turquoises. The turquoise prongs are now owned by Princess Astrid, who wears them as a necklace, and they have not been used for the tiara after Maud's death.

Princess Ragnhild
Hopefully this tiara will later go back to the royal family and not Ragnhild's children,
so maybe Crown Princess Mette-Marit, Princess Märtha Louise,
Princess Ingrid Alexandra, Maud Angelica
or Leah Isadora will wear it.

Diamond Flower Spray Tiara of the Princess Royal, Louise

HRH Princess Louise, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom
The tiara is composed of a diamond flower spray and forget-me-not brooches, the centre a daisy diamond brooch, flanked on each side by graduated diamonds.

The sprays and brooches were wedding gifts to Princess Louise, from:
- Mr Farquhar (Lord Fife’s best man) gave: “a beautiful diamond spray (divisible into three brooches, in a design of forget-me-nots and leaves the blossoms being of the very largest size to which the flower ever grows)”

And various members of the Sassoon family (from Sir Albert Sassoon, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sassoon and Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Sassoon) gave:
exquisite diamond spray of forget-me-nots and leaves.

HRH Princess Louise, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom
In both pictures, Louise is also wearing her fringe tiara as a necklace (see right).
Duchess of Fife
Fringe Tiara

HRH Princess Louise, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom
The fringe tiara was a popular style and many Princess' had tiaras made in this style. Princess Louise was no exception to this as she had a flair for style much like her mother, Queen Alexandra.
The Prince and Princess of Wales
(The future King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra),

the bride’s parents gave several wedding gifts on the event of Princess Louise, Princess Royal's marriage to Sir Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife.


The most splendid was a diamond fringe tiara, pictured above, convertible to a necklace
…of elegant design of alternating and graduating rays, varying from nearly two inches long in the centre to half an inch at the extreme ends”. It was “not dissimilar to that which the Princess of Wales herself wears upon State occasions”.
According to Snowman, the tiara was supplied by Hancock’s.

Princess Louise, Duchess of Fife

wearing the fringe tiara as a necklace.

Princess Louise,  Princess Royal
Below is her daughter
Princess Alexandra

wearing the fringe tiara in a photo.

HRH Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife



DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT DIAMOND FRINGE TIARA
HRH Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia, Duchess of Connaught
Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia married into the British Royal family; marrying Queen Victoria and Prince
Albert's son, Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught.
HRH Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia, Duchess of Connaught

Upon her marriage she was given a diamond fringe necklace formerly the property of the Duchess of Kent (Queen Victoria's mother) as a gift from HM the Queen.

HRH Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia, Duchess of Connaught
*
It is not for certain whether the tiara above is the necklace converted into a tiara or not.

HRH Princess Patricia of Connaught, Lady Ramsay
The tiara was later given to her daughter, Princess Patricia of Connaught. Patricia chose a commoner rather than a husband of royal blood. She married naval Commander (later Admiral) The Hon. Alexander Ramsay, third son of the Earl of Dalhousie.

HRH Princess Louise of the United Kingdom, Duchess of Argyll
DUCHESS OF ARGYLL TIARA
It’s said that this tiara was a wedding gift of the Queen to Princess Louise and that as the Dowager Duchess of Argyll, she left it to her husband’s family. However, the lists of Royal wedding gifts to Princess Louise do not include a diamond tiara and Margaret, Duchess of Argyll’s memoirs indicates that Princess Louise left all her jewellery to the Duke of Kent upon her death.
It is a delicate diamond tiara with a gold frame and the diamonds appear to be set in silver.
Queen Victoria gave it to her fourth daughter Princess Louise when she married the 9th Duke of Argyll.
The tiara has been passed down through the Argyll family.
Jodie Kidd -- wearing the Duchess of Argyll tiara
Jodie Kidd wore the tiara on her wedding day. The bride's paternal grandmother was the Hon Janet Gladys Aitken, daughter of the 1st Baron Beaverbrook, and former wife of Ian Douglas Campbell (later 11th Duke of Argyll), the Hon William Drogo Sturges Montagu, scion of the Earls of Sandwich & Major Thomas Edward Dealtry Kidd, MBE.
Jodie and Jemma were descended from the Beaverbrooks. The heiress Margaret nee Whigham was Ian Campbell, the 11th Duke of Argyll's 3rd wife. Her daughter, Frances Sweeny, married the Duke of Rutland.


"My grandmother Bumby left it to me when she passed away in 1988. I think she wore it to her wedding--or one of them, she married quite a few times! when my grandmother married the 11th Duke in 1927, it was passed on to her. I feel honoured to be wearing it.” - Jodie Kidd.
Source: Hello Magazine
Pearl and Diamond tiara of the
Duchess of Connaught
HRH Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia, Duchess of Connaught

The pearl and diamond tiara the Duchess is wearing in the picture above is composed of 12 bouton and 13 pear-shaped pearls with diamonds and has a chain to form a necklace.
HRH Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia, Duchess of Connaught

Queen Victoria left the Duchess the pearl and diamond tiara given to her by Aga Khan which was mentioned in the inventory of the Queen's jewellery made by Garrards in 1896.


The Duchess' daughter, Princess Patricia of Connaught can be seen wearing the tiara in later photographs; whether or not she received the tiara is not for certain.
The Kent Pearl Swirl tiara
PEARL SWIRL TIARA OF KENT
HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent, Lady Ogilvy
The tiara worn by Princess Alexandra of Kent is a pearl & diamond tiara of 15 linked diamond circles with a pearl in the centre of each was a gift from her grandmother to her mother, Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark, upon her marriage to the Duke of Kent. It can be worn as a tiara or necklace.
Princess Elena of Greece and Denmark, nee Grand Duchess Elena of Russia
The Grand Duchess Vladimir
, it is believed, gave this tiara to Princess Nicholas of Greece(Grand Duchess Elena) as a wedding gift. (see Munn Tiaras plates 286-287 pages 316-317)
Duchess of Kent Diamond Tiara
DUCHESS OF KENT PEARL AND DIAMOND TIARA

probably English, circa 1900. This jewel was a favorite of Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent; which is now with HRH Princess Michael of Kent.
Princess   Marina
"The strict rules of court etiquette remained unaltered, although many members of the nobility, including, Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent,
regarded the tiara as a nuisance."
It was King Edward VII who made his displeasure felt when guests arrived without a tiara.

From Cartier By Hans Nadelhoffer
HRH Princess Michael of Kent, nee Marie von Reibnitz
Above, Princess Michael of Kent wears the tiara along with the diamond daisies of the Duchess of Kent.





The Tiara of
The Princess of Kent

Kent City of  London fringe tiara
Given to Princess Marina of Greece & Denmark,
Duchess of Kent
.
This tiara was as a wedding gift from the Lord Mayor and the City of London on her marriage to
Prince George of the United Kingdom, Duke of Kent.
In 1934 this tiara was presented by the city of London to Princess Marina as a wedding gift. It is a tiara of graduated spikes, made in around 1870 and formerly owned by the Queen of Pudukota. Currently it belongs to Princess Michael of Kent.
HRH Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent nee Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark
This diamond fringe tiara mounted in gold and set in silver. This jewel is unusual in that it flares at the sides to charming effect, and unlike many other tiaras in kokoshnik style, it does not dismantle to make a necklace.
Princess Marina was a great-grandniece of Queen Alexandra through her father's side.

HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent, Lady Ogilvy
In 1968, Princess Marina's daughter Princess Alexandra of Kent,
Lady Ogilvy
wore the tiara on her wedding day.

(above)
HRH Princess Michael of Kent, nee Marie von Reibnitz
Princess Michael of Kent nee Marie-Christine von Reibnitz wearing two versions of the tiara.

The bottom version incorporates a black velvet halo on which the tiara rests; on top is a diamond reviere which was from King George V.
HRH Princess Michael of Kent, nee Marie von Reibnitz

Princess Elena of Greece and Denmark, nee Grand Duchess Elena of Russia
The Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia
,
Princess of Greece and Denmark

(The mother of Princess Marina)
wearing her own Russian Fringe Tiara which was given to her by her mother, the Grand Duchess Vladimir.
The Grand Duchess wore it as a head-jewel in the form of a star.
Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia, nee Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin
The tiara was not passed to Princess Marina. The tiara was passed to her sister,
Princess Elisabeth.
HRH Countess of Toerring-Jettenbach, Princess Elisabeth of Greece and Denmark
The Kent Fringe Tiara

is similar in design to
The Grand Duchess', but
the difference is, the tiara is an actual Romanov Tiara that belonged to
The Romanov Dynasty
as Elena was the daughter of a Grand Duke and granddaughter of Tsar Alexander II of Russia.
The other difference; there are small gaps between the diamond strands and the 'spikes' do not become blunt at the top. The tiara can be worn as a necklace. After the death of Princess Elisabeth, the head jewel was given to her daughter, Helene Countess Toerring-Jettenbach who wore the tiara at her own wedding.
Helene Countess Toerring-Jettenbach
Many people confuse this tiara with the Kent Fringe and for a time it was listed on the Wikipedia page for 'Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's jewels'. In fact the mix up on Wikipedia claimed this was the 'Kent Fringe' while using the picture of Grand Duchess Elena in her tiara. This tiara and the 'Kent Fringe' were never part of Her Majesty's collection.
Archduchess Sophie of Austria, Princess of Windisch-Grätz
Princess Elisabeth's
granddaughter, Archduchess Sophie of Austria wore the tiara for her wedding and is currently the owner.

SCLESWIG-HOLSTEIN TIARAS
OF PRINCESS HELENA

HRH Princess Helena of the United Kingdom
Princess Helena was the third daughter and fifth child (of 9) of Queen Victoria. Above in the picture the Princess is wearing a bandeau of diamonds, which was the wedding gift of her brother Edward and her sister-in-law the Princess of Wales (Princess Alexandra, later Queen).
source:The Scotsman, 7 July 1866; The Times, 6, 7, 11 July 1866; Illustrated London News, July 21, 1866

HRH Princess Helena of the United Kingdom

The tiara, necklace, brooch and earrings of turquoise and diamonds above were part of the gift from the Queen to her daughter as a wedding present.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
THE ANHALT HONEYSUCKLE TIARA
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
Princess Helena (daughter of Queen Victoria)
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
Princess Marie Luise
of Schleswig-Holstein (daughter of Princess Helena)
BATTENBERG VICTORIAN TIARAS
Victorian tiara of Princess Beatrice
FLEUR-DE-LYS TIARA

The Victorian diamond set tiara, with stylised fleur-de-lys and scroll motifs graduating from the centre and set with old round brilliant-cut and rose-cut diamonds, total estimated weight 30cts, all mounted in silver grain and cut-down settings on yellow gold back, convertible into a necklace circa 1870 was sold in 2000 for £42500 and looked very similar of these above in the sketch.

The tiara belonged to Princess Beatrice, the fifth daughter and youngest child (of 9) of Queen Victoria. Beatrice married to Prince Henry of Battenberg; her descendants include the current monarch of Spain.
Victorian tiara of Princess Beatrice
There is no known picture of Princess Beatrice wearing this tiara.

VICTORIAN STAR TIARA
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
Princess Beatrice wearing a star tiara on her wedding day; the tiara was given to her by her mother, Queen Victoria.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki

VICTORIAN STRAWBERRY LEAF TIARA
Queen Victoria Strawberry Tiara

A diamond tiara of strawberry leaves that was once set with rubies, a favorite jewel of Queen Victoria. The Queen owned many tiaras, some of which are now altered, such as this item, which
she had worn at Princess Louise wedding in 1871.
Since her husband Prince Albert’s death, the jewels and jewelry which he had arranged for her were talismanic for her.
Queen Victoria Strawberry Tiara
Along with the tiara there was a matching ruby and diamond necklace and brooch matching the coronet pattern tiara consisting of 14 lozenge-shaped clusters & 13 strawberry leaves with ruby and diamond band - part of a suite with necklace, brooch and earrings.
Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom, Princess of Battenberg
The suite was given to Queen Victora's daughter, Princess Beatrice, on her marriage 23 July 1885.
Queen Victoria Eugenie of Spain, nee Princess of Battenburg and the United Kingdom
Princess Beatrice then loaned it to her daughter, above, Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenburg (Queen consort of Spain). The tiara was passed to Princess Beatrice's eldest son, Prince Alexander of Battenberg. His wife, Lady Irene Denison was the last to be seen wearing the tiara in a painting that was commissioned by her.
Lady Irene Denison, Marchioness of Carisbrooke
It was she who took it to Cartier in 1933 to have the rubies removed. Its present whereabouts are unknown.

More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
The Countess at the 1937 Coronation.
VICTORIAN EMERALD AND DIAMOND TIARA
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
The origin of the name
"Queen Victoria's Emerald and Diamond".
Queen Victoria, the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the Empress of India, whose long period of reign of 63 years and 7 months that extended from June 1837 to January 1901 was the longest in the history of the British Monarchy.
The tiara is self explanatory, as the celebrated tiara was once the valued possession of the Queen.

In keeping with her status as the monarch of the largest and most powerful empire in the world, Queen Victoria had a fabulous collection of jewelry of all varieties such as tiaras, necklaces, chokers, stomachers, brooches, bracelets, earrings, rings etc. set with the most expensive of jewels such as diamonds, emeralds, rubies, sapphires and pearls.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
(cont. right)
Queen Victoria's Emerald Tiara
The "Queen Victoria's Emerald and Diamond Tiara" was one of the most exquisitely crafted tiaras in her collection, and also one of her favorite pieces of jewelry, designed by her own husband, the Prince Consort, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, in the Gothic style.
Victoria's Emerald and Diamond Tiara
Caroline Dewar, Former Duchess of Fife
at the 1960 opening of Parliament.

The present whereabouts of the Tiara are not known but it is believed that the celebrated tiara is now in the possession of one of the descendants of Queen Victoria (i.e. the Harewood family).
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
Being personal jewels of Queen Victoria, the tiara was bequeathed to one of her nine children or their descendants.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
Pictured above is Queen Victoria's granddaughter, Victoria of Hesse, daughter of Princess Alice.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
VICTORIAN GREEK TIARA
Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom

Princess Beatrice
is pictured at the Coronation of King George V, 1911, with her Greek key pattern tiara, surmounted by the
Sunray Diadem
that came to her from her mother
Queen Victoria.

Princess Beatrice of Great Britain

The Sunray Diadem was made for Victoria in c. 1866.

Queen Victoria

The Nobility
The "Other" Spencer Tiara
The "other" Spencer tiara
The "other" Spencer Tiara - usually known as the Honeysuckle Tiara, has been remodeled quite a bit over time. The photo below is the original.
Spencer Honeysuckle Tiara
Below is the wife of the 5th Earl Spencer, Lady Charlotte Seymour wearing the tiara in 1885.
Lady Charlotte Seymour, Countess Spencer
Below is the wife of the 7th Earl, Lady Cynthia Beatrix Hamilton, grandmother of Lady Di
(wearing the tiara in 1953 at the coronation of the current Queen).Lady Cynthia Hamilton, Countess Spencer
It hasn't been worn in public since.
The tiara is on exhibition with the traveling collection of
Diana, A Celebration

Princess Diana
*The photo above is a mock-up, a photo-shopped picture. Diana never wore this tiara.
The Spencer Tiara
The Spencer Tiara
The tiara is entirely a composite with the central element being a gift from Lady Sarah Spencer to Cynthia, Viscountess Althorp as a wedding present in 1919.
More British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki
It was later remounted. Four other elements were made to match it in 1937. Only the two elements at the end are old and are said to have come from a tiara owned by Francis, Viscountess Montagu and left to Lady Sarah Spencer in 1875.
Diand, Princess of Wales nee Lady Diana Spencer

It was worn by Lady Diana Spencer when she married The Prince of Wales in 1981.

Princess Diana
The tiara was subsequently used by Victoria Lockwood when she married the 9th Earl (at that time styled Lord Althorp) in 1989.

Diana, Princess of Wales nee Lady Diana Spencer
Catherine Victoria Lockwood,
The former Countess of Spencer

(below)
Catherine Victoria Lockwood


On 16 September 1989, Charles, then known by the courtesy title of Lord Althorp, married Catherine Victoria Lockwood (b. 1965), a model.


Victoria Lockwood
Victoria Lockwood was the last to wear the tiara in public.

The
Earl and Countess Spencer were divorced on 3 December 1997 and he subsequently remarried and divorced again. The Earl and his first wife had four children, including Lady Kitty and his heir, Louis, Viscount Althorp.

On 18 June 2011, the Earl re-married to Karen Gordon, a Canadian. The tiara was not worn by the new Countess of Spencer.

*The tiara is the
property of the Spencer family
.

The tiara can now be seen at Diana's ancestral family residence,
Althorp Estate.

Victoria Lockwood, former Countess Spencer
Some believe that the tiara is "cursed" -- as the last few women that have worn it on their wedding day were divorced years later.

Lady Mountbatten-Battenburg Diamond Tiara

THE LADY MOUNTBATTEN’S TIARA

M O U N T B A T T E N - B A T T E N B E R G
Lady Mountbatten
Lady Mountbatten dressed for the coronation of George VI, taken by Yevonde, 1937. Lady Edwina Ashley married the uncle of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. Edwina was a descendant of nobility; George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough and Henry Somerset, 6th Duke of Beaufort. She was also a direct descendant of Princess Mary Rose Tudor and Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk through their daughter Lady Eleanor Brandon.

Evoking the elegance of one part of this astonishing woman's lifestyle, Lady Mountbatten's tiara remains a dazzling tribute to a unique kind of aristocratic glamour.
Lady Mountbatten
Thought to have been made around 1910 by a leading French jeweller, possibly Chaumet or Cartier, it is pierced and millegrain-set with circular-cut diamonds in a design of meandering scroll and trefoil motifs. Set in platinum, the tiara has a distinctly modern feel - its fluid symmetry setting it apart from the more formal designs associated with heavier and earlier pieces set in silver and gold.
Lady Pamela Hicks
The tiara and jewels were passed on to Lady Mountabatten's daughter, Lady Pamela Hicks nee Mountbatten, who was a bridesmaid in her cousin Duke Philip's wedding to the future Queen Elizabeth in 1947.
THE HARCOURT TIARA
Harcourt Tiara
A magnificent tiara worn at the coronation of both King George VI in 1937 and Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Christies offers in his catalogue:
"One of the most outstanding and illustrious tiaras of English history which has been in the same family for over 100 years (estimate: £300,000-400,000). Appearing at auction for the first time."

Dowager Viscountess Harcourt
The beautiful Harcourt tiara was worn at the 1937 coronation of King George VI by the Dowager Viscountess Harcourt, in the picture above, dressed in her robes for the coronation of George VI with the emerald and diamond tiara on her head and the Harcourt necklace made for her by Cartier in 1920.

Her daughter, Lady Ashburton, later wore the same tiara at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. Lady Ashburton was the elder sister of William, Second Viscount Harcourt. She married the Hon. Alexander Baring, later sixth Baron Ashburton, in 1924, the father of the present owner.


The exquisite tiara is composed of sprays of diamond flowerheads and leaves running between borders of continuous diamond ribbon motifs with the focus centering on seven outstanding emeralds. The tiara was worn by the Dowager Viscountess together with the ‘Harcourt Emeralds’ – a magnificent emerald and diamond necklace - which Christie’s sold for £1,870,000 in London on 21 June 1989 ( to the jeweller Graff). The emeralds themselves have a fascinating provenance: they originally descended from Mary Hayes Burns, the sister of the banker J. Pierpont Morgan, to her daughter Mary, who married Lewis, first Viscount Harcourt, in 1899. The tiara dates from their wedding.Dowager Viscountess Harcourt
Another more famous jewel in Mary Harcourt's collection, previously sold at Sotheby's New York in 1995, was a necklace set with diamonds once forming the chains of the great comb à pampilles belonging to Empress Eugenie.
Diamond and Aquamarine Tiara
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-Jones
Sophie Countess of Wessex wearing a diamond tiara with an very large oval aquamarine as center-piece. The origins are unknown.

Wessex Tiara
HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex

wearing a diamond tiara with an very large oval aquamarine as center-piece, the centre stone of the tiara can be easily taken out and replaced by other gems,
it is also wearable as necklace.

HRH Sophie, Countess of Wessex nee Sophie Rhys-JonesHRH Sophie of Wessex
HRH Sophie of Wessex

wearing the Wessex Tiara as a
necklace.
HRH The Duchess of Kent, nee Katherine Worsley
Kent Pearl Tiara
Lady Helen Windsor
Lady Helen Windsor wore the tiara her mother the Duchess of Kent wore on her wedding day (which was a gift from the Duchess' parents Colonel Sir William Arthington Worsley, 4th Bt. and Joyce Morgan Brunner). The wedding of Lady Helen Windsor, daughter of Dukes of Kent and Tim Taylor was held in a fairy tale scenario at the Windsor Castle.
The wedding gown was inspired in Tudor style and was designed by Catherine Walker.
Diamond Tiara of Gloucester
HRH Princess Alice Christabel, Duchess of Gloucester, nee Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott

The diamond tiara in the foreground was the gift of the bridegroom, HRH the Duke of Gloucester to his wife Alice Christabel (later Princess Alice).
It is possible to convert the diamond tiara to emeralds and diamonds as illustrated in the pictures above and below.


HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, nee Birgitte Henriksen
Birgitte, Duchess of Gloucester
Wallis, Duchess of Windsor Tiara
The Duchess of Windsor Tiara

Bessie Wallis, Duchess of Windsor
Made of diamonds and thought to be sapphire beads.
The Duchess of Windsor
One of only a few times that The Duchess was ever seen wearing a Tiara. Surprisingly she was not very fond of them. Shocking, yes, when you compare her jewel collection to that little fact.
Duchess of Marlborough diamond tiara
Duchess of Marlborough tiara
The diamond tiara was made by Boucheron for Consuelo Vanderbilt, the Duchess of Marlborough.

The Duchess was part of the great American family, the Vanderbilt's, from whom Gloria Vanderbilt and Anderson Cooper descend.

In the late 1800s, early 1900s, there were many weddings of European aristocrats with American heiresses. For the nobles of the Old World, such unions were shameful, but useful in financial terms; the nobility looked upon the Americans who married into their caste as intruders, unworthy of their new position, much like they did with Wallis Simpson, the Duchess of Windsor.

The Duchess of Marlborough, nee Consuelo Vanderbilt

Consuelo Vanderbilt, Duchess of Marlborough, dressed in court attire.
Lady Curzon tiara
Lady Curzon's tiarasLady Curzon
Born in Chicago, Lady Curzon was born Mary Victoria Leiter. She was an American socialite and debutante. She met her husband while in England. In 1895, in Washington D.C., Mary married Lord Curzon of Kedleston who would later become Viceroy to India.

Lady Curzon
Her other tiara, above, had pearl spikes.
Spencer tiara
Courtesy Albion Art Collection
Countess of Spencer
diamond and pearl tiara


Is worn by Princess Diana's step-mother, Raine, the Countess of Spencer.

The Countess of Spencer
The Countess's first marriage was to the Earl of Dartmouth.
Essex Tiara
The Essex Tiara

According to Geoffrey C. Munn's Tiaras - A History of Splendour (page 257), this tiara was made by Cartier for Adele, Countess of Essex in 1902. Lady Churchill borrowed this tiara from the Countess for the Queen's Coronation in 1953.

Princess Margarita of Romania

Above is Crown Princess Margarita of Romania,who borrowed the tiara from Cartier for her wedding in 1996.

Marquess of Tavistock tiara
Marquess of Tavistock
Amethyst tiara
The Tavistock tiara is owned by the Duke of Bedford and is named after the title of the heir to the dukedom, that of Marquess of Tavistock.
Marquess of Tavistock tiara
The tiara is an amethyst and diamond tiara in the form of vine leaves, circa 1870. In the law of precious stones, the amethyst stands for devotion.
Marquess of Tavistock tiara
Duchess of Portland Tiara
THE PORTLAND ANTIQUE SAPPHIRE, DIAMOND AND NATURAL PEARL TIARA
Geoffrey C. Munn, Tiaras a History of Splendour, Antique Collectors' Club, 1988, pl 86, 87 and 88
Designed as a series of twelve graduated cushion-shaped sapphire and old-cut diamond clusters to the openwork frame of diamond-set swag and husk motifs, embellished with bouton-shaped pearls and diamond line borders to the pear-shaped pearl finials and sapphire collet accents, mounted in silver and gold, circa 1890, inner circumference 54.0cm
Accompanied by report No. 57829 dated 15 November 2010 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating the origin of five sapphires is Ceylon, of four sapphires is Burma and of could not be determined for the remaining three. A sample of three pearls was tested and they were found to be natural saltwater


The tiara is thought to have been made by E. Wolff & Co. for Garrard shortly after the 6th Duke's marriage in 1889. A painted miniature on ivory of Ivy, Duchess of Portland (1887-1982), when she was Marchioness of Titchfield, depicts her wearing the tiara and the matching stomacher brooch. Ivy was the 7th Duke's wife.

It is noted in the 1887 inventory that several of the family jewels were dismantled to construct the tiara.
Ivy, Duchess of Portland nee Ivy Gordon-Lennox

Born Ivy Gordon-Lennox, she was Duchess of Portland from 1943 to 1977 and after wards Dowager Duchess. By both parents she was descended from illegitimate children of the Stuart kings and other nobility linking her to Princess Margaret Tudor and Princess Mary Rose Tudor.
Londonderry Tiara
The Londonderry Tiara

Marchioness of Londonderry

The tiara worn by Theresa, Marchioness of Londonderry, above, has been dramatically altered since it was first made. At one time, each individual element was set with a pearl, but these have been replaced by diamonds and its original gallery of pear-shaped pearls has also been removed.

The diamond parure was made by Garrard in 1854 from stones removed from the jewels and second Garter insignia of the Marchioness Emily.

Marchioness of Londonderry

This tiara along with the stomacher was on display at the
Victoria and Albert Museum

in London, England
(Summer 2010)
Princess Marie Louise’s Indian Tiara
Princess Marie Louise’s Indian Tiara
HRH Princess Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein
The Indian tiara was originally owned by HH Princess Marie-Louise, daughter of HRH Princess Helena, the fifth child of HM Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. She was born Princess Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein at Richmond Lodge in Windsor Park, Berkshire, England. Princess Marie married Prince Aribert of Anhalt. The couple had no children.
The tiara is lavishly filled with sapphires and diamonds.
The Princess Marie-Louise wore this tiara for the 1953 Coronation of the present Queen. She died in 1956. Marie was godmother to Prince Richard, the later and present Duke of Gloucester.

Below is the current Duchess of Gloucester, Birgitte.
HRH The Duchess of Gloucester, nee Birgitte Henriksen
It is not known whether she
bequeathed the tiara to Princess Alice of Gloucester or to the Duke, but it became property of the Gloucester's and the tiara is worn now by the present Duchess, as she did for the Brazilian State Banquet.
The Kent Aquamarine Tiara
Kent Aquamarine Tiara
The Fouquet Tiara with Aquamarines, Diamonds and Pearls
Top, the Kent tiara with aquamarines and enamel designed by Georges Fouquet in 1908.
Duchess of Kent
(Katherine Worsley, Duchess of Kent)
He presented this new type of jewels at the Brussels Exhibition 1910:
a diadem in the form of a flexible gold bandeau consisting of five oval motifs. In the centre of each of these ovals was a large Sibirian aquamarine, the colour of which was heightened by the addition of blue enamel, surrounded by an openwork design made up of small arches set with lines of diamonds and 6 pearls. The jewel was of kokoshnik form in finest style, probably as a tribute to the Russian orgin of the stones.
It was his favorite gem, Georges had such a strong predilection for this blue stone that dealers dubbed him "the father of aquamarine".
The Duchess is wearing the "new" setting which preserves the original arrangement of the five aquamarines within their openwork surrounds composed of small arches. Without the bandeau-form of translucent enamel a jour.
Duchess of Northumberland Strawberry Tiara
The Duchess of Northumberland

Strawberry Tiara

Lady Helen Percy, Duchess of Northumberland
Lady Helen Percy nee
Gordon-Lennox, Duchess of Northumberland
She was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother from 1937 to 1964; wife of Alan Ian Percy, 8th Duke of Northumberland. She was the daughter of the 7th Duke of Richmond.
Helen Percy, Duchess of Northumberland
Devonshire Tiara
The Duchess of Devonshire
The Duchess of Devonshire, née Lady Evelyn FitzMaurice
1893 Devonshire Tiara
The Duchess of Devonshire, née Lady Evelyn FitzMaurice

"The Queen has been complaining about the weight of her tiara ... the Queen doesn't know what a heavy tiara is." ---- Evelyn, Duchess of Devonshire about Queen Mary, for whom she was Mistress of the Robes.
The tiara rests on a band of pairs of stylized buds between collet-set diamonds, surmounted by a sequence of palmettes outlined by diamond borders linked at the base to lotus flowers graduated toward the back, in total ca 1900 diamonds.
The design is made in 1802 by Skinner of Orchard Street for the Duchess of Devonshire, who was presumably given this tiara at the time of her marriage in 1889. Since then the tiara has descended through three generations.


The imposing size and the severity of the classical motifs lend a majestic air to the tiara, entirely appropriate for the wife of a man whose wealth won him the title of "king of Lancashire".
Westminster Faberge Diamond Tiara
FABERGE ART NOUVEAU TIARA

From the collection of the Duke of Westminster


A remarkable Faberge Tiara by the famous Russian goldsmith, his jewelery is rare and his tiaras are rarer still.
The craftsmanship and design that has made the Faberge atelier so famous you will see at that tiara in the form of a graduated band of Cyclamen coum tied with knots of ribbon, purchased from Faberge for the Hon Mrs Wilson Fox. The tiara can be effortlessly removed from its gold frame and worn as an articulated fringe necklace.
Westminster Faberge Diamond Tiara
The Jewel come from the workshops of the chief master jewelery work of Faberge, Albert Holmström in 1903.

Constance, the Duchess of Westminster nee Cornwallis-West (a descendant of Mary Boleyn) not only possessed this tiara but also the amazing enamelled platinum kokoshnik forget me not created by Chaumet (right column).
Constance was wife to the 2nd Duke of Westminster.

Westminster Laurel Wreath tiara
WESTMINSTER LAUREL WREATH TIARA
This Head Ornament in brilliant diamonds, composed of two sprays of myrtle leaves and berries, the stalks are engraved gold network, leaves rubbed-over in a silver setting, pierced to suggest veining and then backed in gold.
Each spray, which is made in two parts measures 7 1/2 inches in length and is made by Faberge work master Albert Holmström. Purchased to mark the marriage of Hugh William Grosvenor and Lady Mabel Florence Crichton, which took place in 1906.

This version of tiara was popular at the turn of the nineteenth century as a revivel of the Neo-classical style. It was a revival of the Neo-classical style. Myrtle leave and berries were sacred to Aphorodite and Faberge used this interpretation of this ancient theme as allegory of grace, love and virginity for this bride - diadem.
Lady Tamara Grosvenor
The most recent bride to wear the diadem was Lady Tamara Grosvenor, daughter of the Duke of Westminster, upon her marriage to
Edward van Cutsem.
Westminster Russian Kokoshnik Tiara
WESTMINSTER RUSSIAN KOKOSHNIK
A unique work, forget-me-not flowers of diamonds and jewels on a background of blue transparent enamel, dreamlike work in platinum tiara by Chaumet, Paris.
Westminster Russian Kokoshnik Tiara
It was modeled on the court kokoschnik the Romanovs, with blue velvet and precious stones.


A delicate jewel decorated with trails of forget-me-not flowers seen against a background of blue plique-a-jour enamel Chaumet composed this kokoshnik closely based on the blue velvet kokoshniks decorated with jewelled ornaments worn at the court of the Czar, this tiara makes an amusing visual pun, as it has as thought by alchemy, been turned into blue enamel and diamonds.
The flowers on decorations is set with 280 brilliant-cut diamonds. This is such an important tiara from the perspective of design and quality.

Purchased by the second Duke of Westminster for his wife, Constance Cornwallis-West (descendant of Mary Boleyn) in 1911 from Chaumet, Paris. The present Duke aquired it again for the family, after many years.
The WESTMINSTER HALO TIARAMore British Royal Tiaras - The Tudors Wiki - Westminster tiara
The large round center diamond was thought to be the Hastings Diamonds. Westminster Arcot diamonds
The Arcots are on either side.
The Arcots were a present from
Nawab of Arcot in 1777 to Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. The Arcots were among the two 'smallest' stones received by the Queen.
The Arcots were placed in a crown for George IV and later in the crown of Queen Adelaide, the consort of his successor, William IV. Queen Adelaide died in 1818 and under the terms of her will the Arcots were ordered to be sold to Rundell & Bridge in 1804.


In 1930 the Parisian jeweler Lacloche mounted the Arcots in the Westminster Tiara, a bandeau style piece, together with the round brilliant and no less than 1421 smaller smaller diamonds. The tiara was pieced to form a design of pavè-set scrolls with arcading, and with clusters of marquise-shaped diamonds between the sections, tapering slightly at the sides, with baguette diamond banding framing the large center stone and with diamond baguettes dispersed singly throughout the tiara.
Westminster Halo tiara
In her memoirs, Loelia, Duchess of Westminster, third wife of the second Duke of Westminster, wrote about the Arcots, "fixed by themselves on the safety-pin they looked extremely bogus, so that a friend who saw me that evening remarked, 'What on earth does Loelia think she's doing, pinning those two lumps of glass on herself?'"

Westminster Tiara after 1959
In June of 1959 the third Duke of Westminster sold the Westminster Tiara to help meet the cost of heavy death-duties. Harry Winston paid £110,000 for it at auction - then a world record price for a piece of jewelry.

Loelia  Duchess of   Westminster
Loelia, Duchess of Westminster

photographed by Cecil Beaton in 1931 wearing the Kokoshnik halo-shaped Tiara
diamond tiara made by the designer Ladoche without the Arcot Diamonds.
Rose Movius Palmer
Rose Movius Palmer purchased the tiara and replaced the Arcot diamonds with turquoise stones.
Westminster Bagration tiara
WESTMINSTER PINK DIAMOND SPINEL BAGRATION TIARA

The parure is dated c.1810. It was attributed to Fossin & Fils, a predecessor of the French jeweler Chaumet. The parure was purchased by the Russian Princess Katharine Bagration, heiress to Prince Potemkin and listed in the 1836 inventory of her jewels.

Its extravagant size and pattern suggest the illustrious lineage of its first owner. In May 1977, the parure was sold at Christie's, New York, for $121,000 (£71,160) by the 6th Duke of Westminster.


Westminster Bagration parure

This tiara is part of a parure in which the jewels that match can be found on the Royal Jewels of the Ladies of Great Britain page no. 2.

It consists of a tiara, head comb, pendant necklace, and earrings.

History of the combination:
This splendid set originally belonged to Princess Ekatarina Pavlovna Bagration, née Skavronskaia (1783 - 1857) Crown Prince Potemkin and the wife of Peter Ivanovic Bagration prínicpe (1765 - 1812), a descendant of the Georgian kings Bagration, himself a distinguished General against Russian forces fighting Napoleon at the battle of Borodino.

She had many admirers and remarried, an English lord.

Westminster Bagration tiara

It is estimated that the set was created in 1810 by French jewelers Fossin & Fils, Chaumet predecessors, and first appears in the inventory of jewels of the Princess Bagration, dated 1836.


Duchess of Westminster, nee Natalia Phillips
The 6th Duke of Westminster gave the set to his girlfriend, who wore the tiara at their wedding in 1978 at Westminster Abbey. In the photo, Natalia Phillips, wears the tiara on the veil.

The Duchess of Westminster is a descendant of Grand Duke Mikhail Mikhailovich and Sophie of Merenberg, Countess de Torby
. The Grand Duke was the grandson of Nicholas I, Tsar of Russia and his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna, nee Princess Charlotte of Prussia.

By both maternal great-grandparents Natalia descends from Sophia, Electress of Hanover, the mother of George I of Great Britain. Therefore she is part of the Line of Succession to the British throne due to the law which allows all descendants of Sophia a position in the Line of Succession (see Margaret and Mary's Descendants). Her sister, Alexandra is the Duchess of Abercorn, married to James Hamilton, 5th Duke of Abercorn.
WESTMINSTER PEARL DROP TIARA
Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

Seven beautiful large ancient oriental pearl drops from the treasury of the Dukes, were framed with diamonds and mounted by old brilliant-cut diamonds, creating seven brooches - which can also be attached to each of the 6 round beads or on the diamond seven similarly-cut diamond husk motifs.


Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

The diadem, pearls, and diamonds are mounted in silver and yellow gold, circa 1860 from Garrard Co.

Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

The round pearls surrounded in diamonds can be worn separately as brooches as well and form the basis of the diadem.

Westminster Pearl Drop original tiara

The compounds are numbered on the back so when the diadem is configured no mistakes happen. It can be compiled in 2 different heights and versions, a very versatile gem, with beautiful, rare pearls. Some may find it 'ugly' when fully assembled but if viewed separately.....


Victorian ladies enjoyed being able to wear versatile pieces. As mentioned before, this diadem can be dismantled into a simpler diadem, several brooches, and earrings.

Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

The jewels and tiaras of the Duke of Westminster were photographed for a magazine -- these pictures show models, not the actual Duchess herself.

Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

Westminster Pearl Drop tiara

Extended family and Descendants of Queen Victoria




Sources
Some tiaras already have the source in the box, for others:
Alexander Palace Time Machine Forums
Christie's of London ONLINE
CNN
Cartier By Hans Nadelhoffer
Forbes.com
Internet Stones website
Mandy's British Royalty Blog: British Jewels
The Official Royal Collection website
"The Royal Jewels" -REVISED- by Suzy Menkes
"The Queen's Jewels" by Leslie Field
The Royal Magazine website
The Royal Forums
The Royal Collection of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Yahoo! News
Wikipedia



The Tale of a Tiara, The Lover's Knot Tiara

TIARAS OF THE HOUSE OF WINDSOR
(belonging to HM Queen Elizabeth II)

  • Queen Alexandra’s Russian Kokoshnik
  • Girl’s of Great Britain and Ireland tiara
  • Queen Mother's Strathmore Rose tiara
  • Queen Mother's Greville Boucheron Honeycomb tiara
  • Delhi Durbar tiara
  • The Grand Duchess Vladimir tiara
  • Queen Mary's Fringe tiara
  • Cambridge Lovers Knot
  • Queen Victoria's Oriental Circlet [worn by the Queen Mum]
  • Cartier Diamond Halo Tiara
  • Queen Elizabeth’s Sapphire tiara [match to the King George VI Suite]
  • Queen Elizabeth's Burmese Ruby tiara
  • Queen Elizabeth's Brazilian Aquamarine tiara [there are two]
  • Queen Mother's Cartier Aquamarine "Pine" tiara
  • Tsarina Maria Feodorovna's Sapphire Bandeau
INDIVIDUAL TIARAS OF THE HOUSE OF WINDSOR
  • Queen Mother’s Papyrus (Lotus Flower) Motif tiara [property of Princess Margaret's children]
  • Queen Mother's Persian Turquoise tiara [Princess Margaret's children]
  • Snowdon Floral tiara [property of Lord Snowdon and Lady Chatto, children of HRH Princess Margaret]
  • Battenburg Greek Meander tiara [property of HRH Princess Anne, Princess Royal]
  • Princess Anne’s Antique Festoon tiara (given from ‘World Wide Shipping Group’)
  • Countess of Wessex Wedding tiara (Regal Circlet – honeysuckle motifs)
  • Countess of Wessex Cluster tiara (Flowers/Buttons)
  • Queen Mary's Aquamarine Centre and diamond tiara [now with HRH The Countess of Wessex]
  • Princess Alexandra’s Flower tiara [property of HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent]
  • Kent Festoon tiara [property HRH Princess Michael of Kent]
  • Cambridge Sapphire – Cluster tiara of Queen Mary [property HRH The Duchess of Kent]
  • Kent - Small Diamond Bandeau of Queen Mary [property of HRH The Duchess of Kent]
  • Iveagh tiara of Queen Mary [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester)
  • Gloucester Turquoise tiara of Queen Mary [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester]
  • Gloucester Emerald Bandeau of Queen Mary [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester]
  • Gloucester Honeysuckle tiara of Queen Mary [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester]
  • Gloucester Diamond Bandeau necklace (diamond necklace also been worn as Tiara) [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester]
  • Princess Marie-Louise Cartier Indian tiara [property of HRH The Duchess of Gloucester]
  • Duchess of Kent Aquamarine and Turquoise Tiaras [property of HRH The Duchess of Kent]

Not seen in decades (or broken up):


  • Queen Alexandra’s ‘Rundell’ tiara [wedding gift]
  • Hannover, George III fringe tiara [probably broken up]
  • Nizam of Hyderabad tiara [said to be broken up]
  • Queen Mary’s wedding gift/tiara from Queen Victoria (said to be broken up to create the Queen Mary’s Fringe Tiara)
  • County of Surrey tiara [wedding gift to Queen Mary]
  • Teck Circlet of Princess Mary Adeleide [Queen Mary's mother, worn by the Queen Mum]
  • Queen Mary’s Diamond Lozenge tiara (worn by HRH Princess Margaret and HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent)
  • Queen Mary’s Diamond Filigree tiara
  • Queen Mary’s Diamond Leaf tiara
  • Queen Mary's "other" Fringe tiara
  • Queen Mary’s 1902 Boucheron Diamond Loop tiara
  • Ladies of England tiara [Queen Mary]
  • Queen Elizabeth’s Sapphire tiara
  • Queen Victoria’s Regal Circlet [possibly re-made in to the wedding tiara of HRH The Countess of Wessex]
  • Sarah, Duchess of York wedding tiara [whereabouts unknown]
  • Queen Victoria's Strawberry Leaf Ruby Tiara [last seen with Lady Irene Denison; whereabouts unknown]
SOLD
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Diamond Diadem
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Fringe tiaras (2) (Queen Mary and Lord and Lady Inchcape)
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Honeysuckle tiara
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Butterfly Centre tiara
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Diamond scroll and cluster circlet
  • HRH Princess Mary’s Emerald tiara
  • HRH Princess Margaret's Poltimore Tiara (sold in 2006)








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Keyword tags: 3rd Spencer Tiara Alexandra Amethyst Tiara Alexandra's Rundell Tiara Alexandra's Russian Kokoshnik Cambridge Lover's Knot Tiara Cambridge Lovers Knot Tiara Camilla Countess of Southesk Countess of Wessex Tiara Countess of Wessex Wedding County of Surrey Tiara Devonshire Tiara Duchess of Cornwall Duchess of Fife Duchess of Fife Tiara Duchess of Gloucester Tiara Duchess of Teck Tiara Duchess of Windsor Tiara Elena Vladimirovna Elisabeth of Hesse Romanova Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Empress Alexandra Kokoshnik Empress Alexandra Lovers Knot Empress Alexandra Pearl Tiara Empress Maria Russian Tiara George III Tiara Gloucester Palmette Tiara Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirov Grand Duchess of Hesse Greek Key Spencer Tiara Hesse Family Tiara Kent Fringe Tiara Kent Russian Fringe Lady Alexandra Duff Lady Charlotte Seymour Lady Cynthia Beatrix Hamilton Lady Mountbatten's Tiara Lady Rose Wedding Tiara Liechtenstein Tiara Marie Antionette Spencer Tiara Marie Feodorovna Diamond Tiara Marie Louise Indian Tiara Marie of Edinburgh Tiaras Maud of Wales Tiara More Spencer Tiaras Mountbatten Diamond Tiara Mystery Tiara of Queen Alexand Nizam of Hyderabad Parure Northumberland Tiara Princess Alexandra of Fife Princess Alexandra of Kent Princess Alice of Britain Princess Anne Princess Diana Tiaras Princess Gina Liechtenstein Princess Ileana of Romania Princess Margaret Princess Marina of Greece Princess Marina of Kent Princess Mary Princess Mary Tiara Princess Mary's Fringe Tiara Princess Maud of Wales Princess Michael of Kent Princess of Kent Tiaras Princess Royal Princess Viktoria of Prussia Queen Alexandra Russian Tiara Queen Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Russian Tiara Queen Elizabeth Tiaras Queen Mary Amethyst Tiara Queen Mary Diamond Loop Tiara Queen Mary Ivegh Tiara Queen Mary Tiaras Queen Mother Queen Victoria Regal Circlet Queen Victoria Sapphire Tiara Romanov Tiara Rundell Tiara Russian Fringe Tiara Russian Kokoshnik Spencer Honeysuckle Tiara Teck Tiara Teck Turquoise Tiara The "Other" Spencer Tiara The Ivegh Tiara The Ogilvy Tiara The Scroll Tiara The Spencer Tiara Tiaras Victoria Lockwood Wedding Victoria Melita Victoria of Battenburg Tiara Wessex Diamond AquamarineTiara Wessex Diamond-Aquamarine
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