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books about Elizabeth Tudor

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Young Bess
Fiction - Romance / Adventure
About the Author: Margaret Irwin
Margaret Irwin is another author of historical fiction whose following extends across generations. Her Elizabeth trilogy was first printed in the 1940's, was made into a feature film staring Jean Simmons in 1953, and the latest reprint was in 2007. Irwin has also written: "The Galliard: The Great Love of Mary Queen of Scots" (Fiction) and "The Great Lucifer: A Portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh" (non-Fiction).
Submitted by: SemperEadem

Comments: Another of the fiction books I read in high school, Young Bess was a favorite of mine. Set during Elizabeth's teen years, it covers her time under Catherine Parr's household, and her time spent with the Lord High Admiral, Thomas Seymour. Historically, I thought Irwin did a fantastic job of documenting the times and the teenage turmoil that Elizabeth would have faced when around Seymour. She did a good job of highlighting the danger of the attraction Elizabeth may have felt for him, and even dabbled in some Tudor economics and property issues! Definitely a book for those familiar with British history, especially Tudor times. An oldie but a goodie, it is easy to understand why this book is still in print after so many years.


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I, Elizabeth
Fiction
About the Author: Rosalind Miles
Submitted by:Madame De Merteuil

Comments: I really enjoyed this book. It does make assumptions about some aspects of Elizabeth's life (the main one being that she had a sexual relationship with Robert Dudley) and I don't always agree with the idea of making assumptions, but the tone of the prose seems right in many chapters. The book is written in the first person as an autobiography, supposedly penned by the Queen at the time of the execution of Essex. Cannot replace a real autobiography by Elizabeth (we can only dream on) but certainly does a good job at humanising the queen whilst respecting the fundamental aspects of her personality.


Submitted by: jmccoy5712

Comments: I have probably read this book four times, just to see if I missed any subtle nuances. I do agree that it cannot possibly be correct seeing as a few details cannot be at all possible, it seems the closest we will ever get to imagining what her life was like. Worth reading.



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The Tudors Bookshelf - Fiction - The Tudors Wiki
Fiction - Mystery
About the Author: Karen Harper

Karen Harper is the author of the nine book series "The Elizabeth I Mysteries". The Poyson Garden is the first and The Hooded Hawk is the most recent. Harper has also written other historical fiction including "The Last Boleyn" and "The First Princess of Wales: A Novel".
Submitted by: SemperEadem

Comments: Set just before Elizabeth becomes queen of England, when Mary still rules, Elizabeth puts on the hat of the sleuth. She's confined to a castle, but she sneaks out to investigate the murders/attempted murders of the Boleyn family. Of course, the history is not always the greatest, but it was fun to see Elizabeth as a detective, her relationship with those close to her, her fears concerning Mary, and her meeting with Mary Boleyn and Henry Carey. I really doubt she could have escaped from her house confinement for as long as she did in the book, and I'm even more doubtful as to her taking on the disguise of a young boy, but when I read this when it first came out (I was still in high school and little background in Tudor histoy), I enjoyed it.


Submitted by: queen_elizabeth_1533

Comments: Although this story certainly didn't happen, I found it very enjoyable. I love this whole series, because it teaches you about certain aspects of Tudor life that you don't always learn about in biographies, and it combines facts and imagination to make a good story. It is fun to read, and I recommend it.


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The Wild Irish
Fiction: Fantasy / Adventure
About the Author: Robin Maxwell
"Wild Irish" is a fictionalized account of the meeting of Elizabeth I with Irish pirate Grace O'Malley in 1593.
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The Lady Elizabeth
Fiction
About the Author: Alison Weir
Submitted by: queen_elizabeth_1533

Comments: This book goes through Elizabeth's life from 1536, when she learns of her mother's execution, to 1558, when she becomes queen. However, in my opinion this book was not as good as Weir's other historical novel, Innocent Traitor. Obviously Weir has a liking for Elizabeth, since she spends much of the book extolling her virtues and when there are passages from the point of view of others besides Elizabeth, they always praise her, no matter who it is. Now, I am a huge fan of Elizabeth and I know that there is much to praise, but I feel like it was too much focus on how great she is instead of a human who is, yes, intelligent but still makes mistakes. The one mistake she does make is still ungratifying, because it is catastrophic for us Elizabeth supporters who like to stick with the history and not rumors. I won't spoil the story, but let's say Weir takes some historical license that she is not allowed in her biographies, only to imagine "what if," as she writes in the afterword. Overall, I was unsatisfied with it, although in all other respects it is accurate, if not annoying.
Submitted by: Lady -Demiya

Comments: This is a beautiful story about the youth of Elizabeth. I especially enjoyed Alison's portrayal of the relationship between Elizabeth and Mary, which is something I love to read about. Henry VIII is also portrayed as loving and doting father, and then how his temper changes quickly (without giving spoilers to the book). It is worth reading!


Submitted by:ClumsyXheart

Comments:I loved the book. I was very intrigued and couldn't put it down. I loved the emotions when Elizabeth mourned the loss of her mother. Also instead of having this be a typical historical fiction novel it was a coming of age novel that even we teenagers could relate to.

Submitted by: Katharine_fanatic

Comments: I was surprised how good this book was, even though it covered a very short period of Elizabeth's life. I enjoyed its depiction of Mary. It was interesting to read what might have happened, but I think the author was stretching things a bit not only by presuming that Elizabeth was raped, but that she also bore an illegitimate child through Thomas Seymour.

Submitted by:yddib

Comments:I really enjoyed this. A very gripping read and gets you very emotional at the end.

Submitted by:Anne'sCurls

Comments: I just finished this book and I have to sing its praises. Although it is not my favorite book about Elizabeth it was a real page turner and I could not put it down. The book goes through multiple points of views so you get an idea of what everybody is thinking in certain situations. Like with most books about Elizabeth, I found myself wanting to slap the girl at certain times. For example the incident with the pendant Katherine Parr gave her; and of course the Admiral scandal. I will admit I hated that part of the book because, Katherine Parr was so sweet and loving to Elizabeth. Edward was given very little thought imo, he just shows up periodically and not enough time is spent on him as opposed to Mary. Anyone who is a fan of Mary or is sympathetic towards her will walk away liking this book and its portrayal of her. Even when the "Bloody Mary" years emerge I still found myself hating the people around Mary more than her. Mary is strong and brave while at the same time small and desperate for somebody to love her. Weir also creates some situations where Elizabeth has to deal with the memory of her mother and what it means to her; allowing those of us who believe her mother meant a lot ot her even though she couldn't say so, to walk away with a smile on our face. Overall a very good read, and now it is on to Innocent Traitor.
Gloriana's Torch
Fiction- Mystery / Adventure
About the Author: Patricia Finney
Patricia Finney is a gifted British author who wrote her first award-winning novel at age 18 before attending Oxford. She has written a mystery/adventure trilogy set in the Elizabethan Era around two fictional courtiers David Becket and Simon Ames. "Gloriana's Torch" the last in the series, takes place during the Spanish Armada. Aside from adult historical fiction, Finney also writes children's books including the Lady Grace Mystery series which has the daughter of George Cavendish as the protagonist.
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My Enemy, The Queen
Fiction
About the Author: Victioria Holt
Victoria Holt is another pseudonym of Eleanor Hibbert, who also wrote under the name Jean Plaidy, (see above). "My Enemy The Queen" revolves around Lettice Knollys / Devereux and her at times heated relationship with her cousin, the Queen of England, Elizabeth I.
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To Shield the Queen
Fiction - Mystery
About the Author: Fiona Buckley
Fiona Buckley is the pseudonym of British author Valerie Anand. "To Shield the Queen" is the first in her series of eight books revolving around the fictional courtier Ursula Blanchard.
Submitted by: Boudica

Comments: I'm reading the first book in this series right now and so far I'm enjoying it. Very light reading I recommend taking it to the beach for a weekend or for afternoons by the pool. Ursula Blanchard is like a 16th century Nancy Drew and it's hard to put the book down while you're wondering what kind of hijinks she'll run into next. Ursula is the illegitimate daughter of a disgraced former lady-in-waiting to Anne Boleyn. After loosing her husband Gerald to the plague, Ursula heads to the court as a lady of the presence chamber to the newly annointed Queen Elizabeth thanks to a good word from her connection, Sir William Cecil. But all is not well in court when rumours spread that the queen is romanticly involved with her master of the horse, the inconveniently married Robert Dudley. Ursula is sent to watch the ailing Lady Dudley to settle court gossip that she is being poisoned by her husband but develops a close friendship to her lady. History tells us what happens next but it's a fun way to retell history from the eyes of a minor courtier turned clandestine spy. Buckley details everyday life of Elizabethean court and sprinkles in humor and romance. Definately recommend for anybody looking for a fun read.


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Kenilworth
Fiction
About the Author: Sir Walter Scott
Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scottland in 1771. He is known for such classics as "Ivanhoe". His novel "Kenilworth" is set in 1575 in the court of Elizabeth I. The plot centers on the marriage of Robert Dudley and Amy Robsart, who is mysteriously murdered.
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The Tudors Bookshelf Fiction - The Tudors Wiki
The Virgin Queen's Daughter
Historical Fiction by Ella March Chase

Submitted by:PrincessCordelia

Comments: I thought that this book was very good. It had a good, interesting storyline. At some points, it was a little slow. One thing that kind of annoyed me was that (I believe) it kind of leaves you hanging in the end. I'm not sure about historical accuracy, since I don't really pay attention to that kind of thing, but it is a very enjoyable read! I really, really liked it! :)

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Cover to Virgin and the Crab
Author: Robert Parry
Genre: Historical fiction
Publisher: CreateSpace Sep. 2009. 490 pages ISBN: 1449515711
Submitted by: rochie

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"AT LAST! - ELIZABETH AND JOHN DEE, THE NOVEL"
This is a story about one of the most remarkable relationships of the Tudor age - that of Elizabeth and her seer and astrologer John Dee - someone whose influence and importance in an emotionally supportive role to one of the greatest of all English women has often been overlooked - until now.

I first encountered this novel in a book club (reading circle) in the UK not too long ago. It had all the things a novel should have, I thought - a fast-moving plot and strong characterisation, but it was also a wonderful, spiritually-inspired read. It was also one of the few works of fiction to treat the man, John Dee, and his achievements with the respect they deserve.

The title refers to the star signs of Elizabeth and John Dee respectively (Virgo, the Virgin - and Cancer, the Crab). Together, they became a formidable combination in a historical sense, and their achievements remain with us still. Platonic friendship between the sexes - a noble, sometimes funny, sometimes passionate tale set in the times of the English Reformation - this is an atmospheric, mysterious work - the past brought to life in a fresh, enchanting kind of way. I love it.


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A Dead Man in Deptford
Fiction
About the Author: Anthony Burgess
In 1993, "A Dead Man in Deptford" was the last book Anthony Burgess published in his lifetime. The novel is based loosely on the life of Christopher Marlowe, playwright and spy of Elizabethan England, and his struggles with the political and sexual conflicts of his time. Anthony Burgess is a British novelist famous for such works as "A Clockwork Orange" and "Nothing Like the Sun".
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Elizabeth






















The Virgin's Lover
By: Philippa Gregory
Submitted by: Lady-Demiya

Comments: Another one of Philippa Gregory's books that I could not finish. This book made me mad, and profoundly annoyed me. This book made me dislike Elizabeth, Robert Dudley (though I have never liked him), and at some points makes Elizabeth act foolish and not the strong willed woman she was.

I think it was the way Philippa portrayed Robert and how he made her do things that got to me. I highly doubted that Elizabeth would have acted the way she is made to act in this book.
Elizabeth
Elizabeth the Queen
By: Alison Weir
Submitted by: Lady-Demiya

Comments: This is more non-fictional, but there are assumption into her life. Not very many, but there are some.
It is a very detailed biography, and well the only biography of Elizabeth I have read. It is based around her reign and the men and women she loved and hated. It shows her power and greatness in Christendom, but at the same time it shows her more private life and what she believed that made her beautiful. It is very intriguing. I have learned a lot from this book.

Worth Reading.











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